On April 14, 2011, USIP hosted Dr. Abdullah Abdullah for a discussion on the security and political transitions in Afghanistan.

Read the event analysis, A Voice from the Opposition: The Way Ahead in Afghanistan

 

In mid-March, President Hamid Karzai announced those areas of Afghanistan that will be handed over to Afghan Security Forces in 2011 as part of the transition strategy which aims for the withdrawal of international forces by 2014. As the country gears up for the 2014 presidential elections and with Karzai's calls for a loya jirga to decide the post-2014 role of America in Afghanistan, concerns regarding the security and political transition, and how to establish a sustainable peace in Afghanistan, must be addressed.

On April 14, 2011, USIP hosted Dr. Abdullah Abdullah for a discussion on these political questions, focused specifically on the inherent challenges in these transitional processes and his insights on the way forward in Afghanistan for political institutions and the international community.

Speakers

  • Dr. Abdullah Abdullah
    Afghanistan Democratic Opposition Leader, Chairman
    Afghanistan Coalition for Change and Hope
  • Tara Sonenshine, introduction
    Executive Vice President
    U.S. Institute of Peace
  • William Taylor, moderator
    Senior Vice President, Center for Conflict Management
    U.S. Institute of Peace

Explore Further

 

If you are interested in this event, you may also be interested in the following Academy Courses:

 

Related Publications

Afghanistan Withdrawal Should Be Based on Conditions, Not Timelines

Afghanistan Withdrawal Should Be Based on Conditions, Not Timelines

Thursday, November 19, 2020

By: Scott Worden

The Taliban’s tactic of running out the clock on the U.S. troop presence may bear fruit after the announcement on Tuesday that U.S. forces will reduce to 2,500 by January 15. The Trump administration successfully created leverage by engaging directly with the Taliban to meet their paramount goal of a U.S. withdrawal in exchange for genuine peace talks and counterterrorism guarantees. This strategy brought about unprecedented negotiations between Afghan government representatives and the Taliban in Doha. A walk down a conditions-based path to peace, long and winding as it may be, had begun.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Peace Processes

Constitutional Issues in the Afghan Peace Negotiations: Process and Substance

Constitutional Issues in the Afghan Peace Negotiations: Process and Substance

Friday, November 13, 2020

By: Barnett R. Rubin

The peace negotiations between the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and the Taliban that began in September in Doha, Qatar, will almost certainly include revisiting the country’s constitution. Both sides claim to abide by Islamic law, but they interpret it in very different ways. This report examines some of the constitutional issues that divide the two sides, placing them within the context of decades of turmoil in Afghanistan and suggesting ideas for how the peace process might begin to resolve them.

Type: Special Report

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

Pathways for Post-Peace Development in Afghanistan

Pathways for Post-Peace Development in Afghanistan

Tuesday, November 3, 2020

By: Khyber Farahi; Scott Guggenheim

Even if the warring parties in Afghanistan manage to secure a still-elusive agreement on resolving the current conflict, significant economic challenges remain for the country, which will require continued assistance and support for core government functions. This report, based on an examination of Afghanistan’s recent development performance, provides a framework for how the Afghan government and its donor partners can more effectively deliver equitable development going forward.

Type: Special Report

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

Afghan Peace Process Tests Women Activists

Afghan Peace Process Tests Women Activists

Tuesday, October 27, 2020

By: Belquis Ahmadi; Matthew Parkes

More than a month after Afghan peace talks formally began, the effort to end the war in Afghanistan is stalled, and no one faces higher stakes than Afghan women. The attempt at negotiations has snagged on preliminary issues, the Taliban have escalated their attacks, and all sides are watching the evolution of the U.S. military role in the country. Afghan women’s rights advocates say the moment, and the need for international support, is critical. U.S. officials have noted how U.S assistance can be vital in supporting women’s rights, a principle that can be advanced at a global donors’ conference next month.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Gender; Peace Processes

View All Publications