As the new Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf government settles into its second month in office, it has yet to publicly articulate a comprehensive vision for its foreign policy. Pakistani Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi is currently undertaking his first official trip to the U.S., attending the U.N. General Assembly and meeting in Washington with his counterpart U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. In previous speeches, Qureshi promised that Pakistan’s foreign policy will “begin and end at Pakistan,” but many questions remain on how the government intends to implement this vision.

At an initial meeting in Islamabad earlier in September, Pompeo expressed a desire to find common ground between the two countries, but also reiterated the United States has “real expectations” for the new government. In recent months, the U.S. government has also moved to prioritize a peace process in Afghanistan, historically a major source of contention between the United States and Pakistan. Progress on an Afghan political settlement could provide the opportunity needed to right the often-fraught bilateral relationship. How can we expect Pakistan’s new government to respond?

Following his meeting in Washington with Secretary Pompeo on October 2, Foreign Minister Qureshi spoke at the United States Institute of Peace to share the new government’s strategy for engaging with the United States, and the world more broadly, for the first time. He also took questions from the audience. Join the conversation on Twitter with #QureshiUSIP.

Speakers

Shah Mahmood Qureshi
Federal Minister for Foreign Affairs
Islamic Republic of Pakistan

Related Publications

Pakistan’s Leader Vows to Press Afghan Taliban to Join Talks

Pakistan’s Leader Vows to Press Afghan Taliban to Join Talks

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

By: USIP Staff

Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan vowed to return home from his first official trip to Washington and meet leaders of the Afghan Taliban to persuade them to drop their rejection of peace talks that include the Afghan government. Khan spoke to an audience of U.S. policymakers, scholars and diplomats at the U.S. Institute of Peace following talks with President Trump in his first visit to the United States as prime minister. Khan discussed his meeting with Trump and hopes for an improved relationship with the United States, as well as Pakistan’s struggles with corruption and poverty, and relations with its neighbors.

Peace Processes

Exposure to Violence and Voting in Karachi, Pakistan

Exposure to Violence and Voting in Karachi, Pakistan

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

By: Mashail Malik ; Niloufer Siddiqui

Pakistan’s 2018 elections marked just the second time in history that power transferred peacefully from one civilian government to another after a full term in office. Although the initial months of campaigning were relatively free of violence, the two weeks before polling were dangerous for campaigners and voters alike, and the elections provided a platform for some parties to incite violence, particularly against Pakistan’s minority sects. This report provides a deep examination of how exposure to political violence in Pakistan’s largest city affects political behavior, including willingness to vote and faith in the democratic process.

Electoral Violence

View All Publications