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The Prime Minister of Pakistan, His Excellency Mian Muhammad Nawaz Sharif, will reflect on developments in his country and the broader region and assess the future of relations with the United States in an address, during his official visit to Washington, D.C. His address will take place at the U.S. Institute of Peace on Friday, October 23 at 10:00am.

Read the event coverage, Pakistan’s Sharif Urges Renewed Peace Talks in Afghanistan.

20151023-PM-Sharif-event.jpg

Speakers:

His Excellency Mian Muhammad Nawaz Sharif, Speaker
Prime Minister, Islamic Republic of Pakistan

Nancy Lindborg, Welcoming Remarks
President, United States Institute of Peace

Stephen J. Hadley,
Chairman, Board of Directors, United States Institute of Peace

Media guidance for event coverage.

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