The conflict in Yemen has precipitated the world’s worst humanitarian crisis. According to the United Nations, two-thirds of Yemenis need humanitarian assistance to survive. Meanwhile, more than 16 million people will face hunger this year, with nearly 50,000 Yemenis in famine-like conditions. Almost half of Yemen’s children under age five will suffer from acute malnutrition, including 400,000 who could die without urgent treatment.

Filmed from inside two of the most active therapeutic feeding centers in Yemen, “Hunger Ward” documents two female health care workers fighting to thwart the spread of starvation against the backdrop of Yemen’s raging conflict. The film provides an unflinching portrait of Dr. Aida Alsadeeq and Nurse Mekkia Mahdi as they try to save the lives of hunger-stricken children within a population on the brink of famine. 

On April 12, USIP hosted a screening of the Oscar-nominated documentary “Hunger Ward,” followed by a discussion of the film and the ongoing humanitarian crisis in Yemen with acclaimed journalist and PBS NewsHour anchor Judy Woodruff, Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Skye Fitzgerald, and former U.N. Resident Coordinator for Yemen and current USIP President and CEO Lise Grande.

This program was presented in partnership with MTV Documentary Films.

Registration was required for this screening. After registering, viewers received a confirmation email with instructions on how to access the viewing platform. The film was not shown on USIP's website or social media channels.

Agenda

7:00pm: Film Screening

7:50pm: Introductory Remarks

  • Lise Grande
    President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace

7:55pm: Discussion with “Hunger Ward” Director

  • Judy Woodruff
    Anchor and Managing Editor, PBS NewsHour
  • Skye Fitzgerald
    Director and Academy Award Nominee, “Hunger Ward”

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