The issue of nuclear arms control and disarmament is gaining momentum on the global agenda with the Nuclear Security Summit to be held in Washington on April 12-13, 2010 and the 8th Review Conference of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) in New York from May 3-28. Please join USIP and the George Washington Elliott School as Ambassador Jayantha Dhanapala, USIP Jennings Randolph senior visiting scholar, discusses the role of nuclear weapon-free zones and their contribution to the nuclear non-proliferation regime.

The issue of nuclear arms control and disarmament is gaining momentum on the global agenda with the Nuclear Security Summit to be held in Washington on April 12-13, 2010 and the 8th Review Conference of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) in New York from May 3-28. Please join USIP and the George Washington Elliott School as Ambassador Jayantha Dhanapala, USIP Jennings Randolph senior visiting scholar, discusses the role of nuclear weapon-free zones and their contribution to the nuclear non-proliferation regime. 

Ambassador Dhanapala is widely acclaimed for his presidency of the 1995 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review and Extension Conference, a landmark event in disarmament history.  He is also the president of Pugwash, an international organization that brings together scholars and policy makers to reduce the dangers of armed conflict and which received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1995 for its efforts in favor of nuclear disarmament.

Speakers

  • Jayntha Dhanapala
    Jennings Randolph Senior Visiting Scholar, U.S. Institute of Peace
    Former U.N. Undersecretary-General for Disarmament
  • Chantal de Jonge Oudraat, Moderator
    Associate Vice President, Jennings Randolph Fellowship Program, U.S. Institute of Peace

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