With the prospects of U.S.-North Korea working-level negotiations rekindled after President Trump’s recent surprise meeting with Kim Jong Un at the Korean Demilitarized Zone, sanctions relief remains one of the key sticking points. Pyongyang is demanding relief from economic and financial sanctions in exchange for steps toward denuclearization, raising questions for U.S. policymakers about whether and how to roll back the complex regime of U.S. and multilateral sanctions.

USIP hosted this discussion that examined the scope and purposes of the North Korea sanctions regime, considered the constraints and opportunities for providing partial and complete sanctions relief, and provided a comparative look at other such regimes. Join the conversation with #DPRKsanctions.

Speakers

Stephanie Kleine-Ahlbrandt 
Member, U.N. Panel of Experts (Resolution 1874)

Elizabeth Rosenberg
Senior Fellow, Center for a New American Security

Joshua Stanton
Blogger, One Free Korea

Daniel Wertz
Program Manager, National Committee on North Korea

Frank Aum, moderator
Senior Expert, U.S. Institute of Peace 
 

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