Mass movements employing nonviolent action have a demonstrated track record of improving democracy. But how deep and meaningful are these changes? Does nonviolent action merely change political institutions, or can it also address deeper drivers of social and political conflict, particularly for the most marginalized?

Pro-Democracy protesters during a demonstration along the outskirts of Kathmandu, Thursday, April 13, 2006. (Tomas van Houtryve/The New York Times)
Pro-Democracy protesters during a demonstration along the outskirts of Kathmandu, Thursday, April 13, 2006. (Tomas van Houtryve/The New York Times)

To better understand the intersection of nonviolent action and peace processes, join USIP for the final event in our series on people power, peace and democracy. The event series highlights multiple groundbreaking research projects and features insights from activists, international practitioners and policymakers that provide viewers with actionable takeaways.

This USIP event features lessons learned from cutting-edge research showing how nonviolent action affects political and economic inequality — particularly for historically excluded social and ethnic groups — using a cross-national statistical study and in-depth case studies from recent political transitions in Nepal and Indonesia. The research also specifically examines how movements can employ dialogue, negotiation and mediation to better ensure that political transitions following nonviolent action campaigns lead to greater inclusion for marginalized groups. This event will explore the important implications for both policy and practice in ensuring more inclusive democratization processes in the aftermath of nonviolent action. 

Learn more about the first, second and third events in the series. Take part in the conversation on Twitter with #PeoplePower4Peace.

Speakers

Jonathan Pinckney, moderator
Senior Researcher, Nonviolent Action, U.S. Institute of Peace 

Mohna Ansari
Member, National Human Rights Commission of Nepal

Subindra Bogati
Founder and Chief Executive, Nepal Peacebuilding Initiative

Titik Firawati
Ph.D. Candidate in Political Science, Northern Illinois University

Rosa Emilia Salamanca
Director, Institute for Social and Economic Research and Action

Deepak Thapa
Director, Social Science Baha

Ches Thurber
Assistant Professor, Northern Illinois University

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