In the aftermath of war, two processes are vital to successfully manage the transition to stability: disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR) and security sector reform (SSR).  On September 12, 2011, the U.S. Institute of Peace hosted a panel of distinguished experts with combined experience implementing DDR and SSR in Afghanistan, Iraq, Liberia, the Balkans, Somalia and Haiti.

In the aftermath of war, two processes are vital to successfully manage the transition to stability: disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR) and security sector reform (SSR).  DDR involves disbanding armed groups that challenge the state's monopoly of force.  SSR involves reforming the state's security forces so they are accountable to the people they are sworn to protect.  Historically, DDR and SSR have been viewed as linear and tackled in that order.  In fact, the demobilization of former fighters and the creation of new security forces are complex, interdependent processes.  

On September 12, 2011, the U.S. Institute of Peace hosted a panel of distinguished experts with combined experience implementing DDR and SSR in Afghanistan, Iraq, Liberia, the Balkans, Somalia and Haiti.  The panel discussed lessons learned and recommendations for future peacebuilding operations.  The event introduced the National Defense University Press's new book, Monopoly of Force: The Nexus between DDR and SSR.  This compilation of essays by experts and practitioners grew out of a March 2010 conference organized by USIP and the Center for Complex Operations at NDU.

Speakers

  • Ambassador James Dobbins (ret.), Panelist
    RAND Corporation
  • Lt. Gen. David Barno (ret.), Panelist
    Center for New American Security
  • Ambassador John Blaney (ret.), Panelist
    Deloitte Consulting LLP
  • Melanne Civic, Esq., Panelist
    Center for Complex Operations, National Defense University
  • Robert Perito, Moderator
    U.S. Institute of Peace

Explore Further

Related Academy Courses

Related Publications

Improving Afghanistan’s Public Finances in 2017–2019: Raising Revenue and Reforming the Budget

Improving Afghanistan’s Public Finances in 2017–2019: Raising Revenue and Reforming the Budget

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

By: William Byrd; Shah Zaman Farahi

The Afghan government has recently embarked on important reforms to the national budget, embodied in the 2018 budget approved by Parliament early this year. This budget sets in motion an envisaged two-year reform process to achieve greater overall transparency, better development programming, and reduced corruption. The third in a series on Afghanistan’s public finances, this report updates revenue performance in 2017 and assesses the new budgetary reforms, how the draft budget fared in Parliament, the outcome, and next steps and prospects for the reforms.

Economics & Environment

Mike Yaffe on Iraq and Syria Event

Mike Yaffe on Iraq and Syria Event

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

By: Michael Yaffe

Following USIP’s event “Iraq and Syria: Views from the U.S. Administration, Military Leaders and the Region,” Mike Yaffe provides key takeaways from the panel featuring CENTCOM Commander General Votel, USAID Administrator Green, and Special Presidential Envoy for the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS McGurk. "Iraq and Syria are complex and starkly different from one another," says Yaffe, "but the key goals are the same: concentrate on defeating ISIS and work by, with, and through local people to stabilize each country."

Violent Extremism; Democracy & Governance

Tilting Iraq and Syria Toward Stability—and Away From ISIS

Tilting Iraq and Syria Toward Stability—and Away From ISIS

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

By: USIP Staff

With last year’s military rollback of the ISIS-declared caliphate, U.S. security and Middle Eastern stability require some way to establish governance in Iraq and Syria that meets the needs of their peoples, according to U.S. administration and military leaders, Iraqi officials and regional experts speaking on April 3 at USIP. During a day-long examination of strategy to stabilize the region and prevent a revival of ISIS, U.S. special presidential envoy Brett McGurk said President Trump’s March 30 order to freeze spending on post-combat recovery efforts in Syria “is not hampering our work in the field.”

Violent Extremism; Democracy & Governance

View All Publications