Sponsored by USIP and ITVS, the Media as Global Diplomat series of summits has highlighted the expanding power of today's media to transform public diplomacy and promote peaceful international relations since 2009. This year's summit, Media that Moves Millions, looked at the unprecedented phenomena of user-generated media campaigns that have inspired masses of participants and rocked political systems.

panel speaking at the event

The first part of the event featured, on stage, those campaigns that have captured the world's attention by successfully using participatory media for social change, particularly in conflict settings, including the We Are All Khaled Said, Half the Sky, and Kony 2012 campaigns. The second portion of the day offered hands-on instruction by experts from Facebook, Twitter and Indiegogo to individuals and organizations alike seeking to use the ever-expanding toolkit of media for social change and peacebuilding.

Livestream: This event was livestreamed beginning at 9:00am EST on February 28, 2013. Online viewers were able to engage panelists and each other through live chat and Twitter discussions (Hashtag: #GlobalDiplomat).

Welcome Remarks and Introductions

  • Sheldon Himelfarb
    Director, Center of Innovation: Media, Conflict, and Peacebuilding, USIP
  • Kristin Lord
    Executive Vice President, USIP
  • Sally Fifer
    President, CEO, ITVS
  • Hari Sreenivasan
    PBS NewsHour Correspondent

Keynote Address

  • Alec Ross
    Senior Advisor for Innovation, US Department of State

PANEL I: From Screens to Streets

  • Frank Sesno (moderator)
    School of Media and Public Affairs, George Washington University
  • Abderrahim Foukara
    Washington, D.C. Bureau Chief, Al Jazeera
  • Adel Iskandar
    Media Scholar, Academic
  • Matthew Perault
    Public Policy Manager, Facebook
  • Nadine Wahab
    We Are All Khaled Said
  • Oscar Morales
    One Million Voices Against The FARC

Keynote & Intro Panel II

  • Clay Shirky
    Author, Professor, NYU

PANEL II: Going Global – Building Networks of International Support

  • Frank Sesno (moderator)
    School of Media and Public Affairs, George Washington University
  • Ben Keesey
    Executive Director, CEO, Invisible Children
  • Jenifer Snyder
    Executive Director and President, The mGive Foundation
  • Kathy Calvin
    President and CEO, United Nations Foundation
  • Maro Chermayeff
    Executive Producer, Half the Sky
  • Nicholas Kristof
    The New York Times
  • Veronica Eragu
    EDG Venture Consult, Uganda (Teleconference)

Lunchtime Keynote

  • Tamara Gould
    Sr. Vice President, National Productions and Strategic Partnerships, ITVS
  • Patricia de Stacy Harrison
    President and Chief Executive Officer, CPB
  • Nicholas Kristof
    The New York Times

Facebook for Content Creation, Curation and Movement Building

  • Brooke Oberwetter
    Associate Manager of External Affairs, Facebook

Unlocking the Power of Twitter and 10x10

  • Kate Gardner
    Founder, Dstl
  • Didi Bethurum
    Director of Marketing & Digital Strategy, 10x10

Crowdfunding

  • Danae Ringelmann
    Founder, Indiegogo

Half the Sky & Games for Social Change

  • Asi Burak
    Co-President, Games for Change

Latest Publications

Struggle for Sinjar: Iraqis’ Views on Governance in the Disputed District

Struggle for Sinjar: Iraqis’ Views on Governance in the Disputed District

Monday, April 12, 2021

By: Osama Gharizi

Iraq’s Sinjar district and its communities have struggled to recover from the recent conflict against the Islamic State group (ISIS). This is due in large part to the fact that the district is one of 14 territories under dispute between Iraq’s federal government and the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG). As a result, Sinjar has become an arena for competition between the federal government, KRG and other actors in the post-ISIS period. This reality has led to frustration, anger and disillusionment among the communities in Sinjar, the majority of whom are Yazidi (Ezidi).

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance

New Talks Could Help Iraq Find Room to Stabilize Amid Crises

New Talks Could Help Iraq Find Room to Stabilize Amid Crises

Thursday, April 8, 2021

By: James Rupert

As Iraq’s government struggles to build stability in the face of economic decline, COVID, political protest and periodic violence, it may see new hope for some maneuvering room in its narrow political space between the United States and Iran. One day after U.S. and Iranian officials agreed through intermediaries to work toward restoring the 2015 accord over Iran’s nuclear program, American and Iraqi diplomats announced an intent to remove U.S. combat forces from Iraq. Both initiatives face deep uncertainties. But if successful they could widen Iraq’s difficult path toward peace.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy; Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

Getting to the Source: The Importance of Field Research

Getting to the Source: The Importance of Field Research

Wednesday, April 7, 2021

By: Alastair Reed; Boglarka Bozsogi

Travel restrictions and social distancing practices put in place in response to the COVID-19 pandemic have largely ground field research to a halt. Fieldwork plays an essential but often underappreciated role in both understanding violent extremism and developing policy responses to it. It is vital, therefore, that funders and policymakers support the return of such important work in a post-pandemic world.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Education & Training

How Military Chaplains Are Key Agents for Peace for the U.S. Armed Forces

How Military Chaplains Are Key Agents for Peace for the U.S. Armed Forces

Monday, April 5, 2021

By: Knox Thames; Melissa Nozell

Over the past few decades, U.S. military chaplains have increasingly played a key role in promoting peaceful resolutions in conflict environments. While their primary mission across the service branches is pastoral care — leading religious services, providing counsel and offering spiritual guidance, for example — military chaplains have also, at times, served as liaisons and bridge-builders with local religious leaders.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Religion

China’s High-Stakes Calculations in Myanmar

China’s High-Stakes Calculations in Myanmar

Wednesday, April 7, 2021

By: Jason Tower

The ultimate outcome of Myanmar’s nine-week-old coup will affect a range of international actors — but none more than China. As Asia’s greatest power, China has strategic and economic stakes in its neighbor to the south that leave little space for genuine neutrality behind a façade of non-interference. Since February 1, Beijing has profoundly shaped the trajectory of post-coup violence and blocked international efforts to restore stability.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Global Policy

View All Publications