Sponsored by USIP and ITVS, the Media as Global Diplomat series of summits has highlighted the expanding power of today's media to transform public diplomacy and promote peaceful international relations since 2009. This year's summit, Media that Moves Millions, looked at the unprecedented phenomena of user-generated media campaigns that have inspired masses of participants and rocked political systems.

panel speaking at the event

The first part of the event featured, on stage, those campaigns that have captured the world's attention by successfully using participatory media for social change, particularly in conflict settings, including the We Are All Khaled Said, Half the Sky, and Kony 2012 campaigns. The second portion of the day offered hands-on instruction by experts from Facebook, Twitter and Indiegogo to individuals and organizations alike seeking to use the ever-expanding toolkit of media for social change and peacebuilding.

Livestream: This event was livestreamed beginning at 9:00am EST on February 28, 2013. Online viewers were able to engage panelists and each other through live chat and Twitter discussions (Hashtag: #GlobalDiplomat).

Welcome Remarks and Introductions

  • Sheldon Himelfarb
    Director, Center of Innovation: Media, Conflict, and Peacebuilding, USIP
  • Kristin Lord
    Executive Vice President, USIP
  • Sally Fifer
    President, CEO, ITVS
  • Hari Sreenivasan
    PBS NewsHour Correspondent

Keynote Address

  • Alec Ross
    Senior Advisor for Innovation, US Department of State

PANEL I: From Screens to Streets

  • Frank Sesno (moderator)
    School of Media and Public Affairs, George Washington University
  • Abderrahim Foukara
    Washington, D.C. Bureau Chief, Al Jazeera
  • Adel Iskandar
    Media Scholar, Academic
  • Matthew Perault
    Public Policy Manager, Facebook
  • Nadine Wahab
    We Are All Khaled Said
  • Oscar Morales
    One Million Voices Against The FARC

Keynote & Intro Panel II

  • Clay Shirky
    Author, Professor, NYU

PANEL II: Going Global – Building Networks of International Support

  • Frank Sesno (moderator)
    School of Media and Public Affairs, George Washington University
  • Ben Keesey
    Executive Director, CEO, Invisible Children
  • Jenifer Snyder
    Executive Director and President, The mGive Foundation
  • Kathy Calvin
    President and CEO, United Nations Foundation
  • Maro Chermayeff
    Executive Producer, Half the Sky
  • Nicholas Kristof
    The New York Times
  • Veronica Eragu
    EDG Venture Consult, Uganda (Teleconference)

Lunchtime Keynote

  • Tamara Gould
    Sr. Vice President, National Productions and Strategic Partnerships, ITVS
  • Patricia de Stacy Harrison
    President and Chief Executive Officer, CPB
  • Nicholas Kristof
    The New York Times

Facebook for Content Creation, Curation and Movement Building

  • Brooke Oberwetter
    Associate Manager of External Affairs, Facebook

Unlocking the Power of Twitter and 10x10

  • Kate Gardner
    Founder, Dstl
  • Didi Bethurum
    Director of Marketing & Digital Strategy, 10x10

Crowdfunding

  • Danae Ringelmann
    Founder, Indiegogo

Half the Sky & Games for Social Change

  • Asi Burak
    Co-President, Games for Change

Latest Publications

Breaking the Stalemate: Biden Can Use the U.S.-Taliban Deal to Bring Peace

Breaking the Stalemate: Biden Can Use the U.S.-Taliban Deal to Bring Peace

Thursday, February 25, 2021

By: Scott Worden

On the eve of the one-year anniversary of the U.S.-Taliban agreement, Afghanistan remains unfortunately far away from peace. The historic agreement paved the way for a full U.S. withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan and the start of intra-Afghan talks on a political settlement of the conflict. As the May 1 withdrawal deadline nears, the Biden administration is undertaking a rapid Afghanistan policy review to determine its overall strategy toward the slow-moving intra-Afghan negotiations in Doha, Qatar. A key reason for the lack of movement in talks is that both sides are anxiously waiting to see what Biden decides. 

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Peace Processes

Months After Protests, Nigeria Needs Police Accountability

Months After Protests, Nigeria Needs Police Accountability

Thursday, February 25, 2021

By: Emily Cole

In Nigeria and more than a dozen nations—the United States, Brazil and Japan are others—public protests erupted in the past year against police brutality. Across the globe, police violence traumatizes the marginalized, spares the powerful and remains unaddressed until the abuse is illuminated to broad public view. While brutality is typically rooted among a minority of officers, it persists because weak systems of police accountability offer impunity, even to repeat offenders. In Nigeria, as in other countries, the solution will require building strong accountability mechanisms—both within police agencies and externally, in the communities they serve.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Justice, Security & Rule of Law; Democracy & Governance

Libya: Amid Hope for Peace, Regional Rifts Still Pose Hurdles

Libya: Amid Hope for Peace, Regional Rifts Still Pose Hurdles

Friday, February 26, 2021

By: Simona Ross; Stefan Wolff

Libyans and the United Nations advanced their current effort to end almost a decade of instability and war this month when a U.N.-backed forum nominated an interim government to prepare nationwide elections by the end of 2021. The new transitional government brings hope that this process—the third major U.N. peace effort in Libya—might lead to stability. Still, achieving lasting peace will require that the process address the main underlying driver of conflict: the divisions among Libya’s three main regions, notably over how to organize the government. It also will need the United States and other countries to support the transitional government and hold Libya’s contesting sides accountable.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Peace Processes; Democracy & Governance

Can Markets Help Foster Civil Society in North Korea?

Can Markets Help Foster Civil Society in North Korea?

Wednesday, February 24, 2021

By: Anthony Navone

After North Korea’s planned economy faltered in the 1990’s, resulting in a devastating famine known as the “Arduous March,” citizens turned to an informal market system for survival. Desperate for some semblance of stability, the North Korean state initially tolerated these rudimentary transactions as a financial necessity. These markets have grown in scale and complexity over the last two decades—and in the process, have facilitated the growth of unofficial economic networks that exhibit signs of a nascent semi-autonomous public sphere that is unprecedented in North Korean society.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance

North Korea in Africa: Historical Solidarity, China’s Role, and Sanctions Evasion

North Korea in Africa: Historical Solidarity, China’s Role, and Sanctions Evasion

Wednesday, February 24, 2021

By: Benjamin R. Young

North Korea serves as a mutually beneficial partner for many African governments. Although these ties are often viewed solely through the lens of economic and security interests, this report shows Pyongyang's deep historical connections and ideological linkages with several of the continent’s nations. North Korea–Africa relations are also bolstered by China, which has been complicit in North Korea’s arms and ivory trade, activities providing funds that likely support the Kim regime’s nuclear ambitions and allow it to withstand international sanctions.

Type: Special Report

Democracy & Governance

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