Never before have the media played a more integral role in conflict management. At the same time, funding agencies and policymaking bodies have greater expectations for demonstrating impact and efficacy in this area. To meet these growing needs, media development practitioners, donors, international broadcasters and methodologists have collectively authored guiding principles to improve monitoring and evaluation of media interventions in conflict zones. On September 9, 2011 the Caux Guiding Principles were presented by those organizations who convened the unprecedented working session in Caux, Switzerland, where drafting of these Principles began.

Read the event coverage, Panel at USIP Calls for Assessing Media Actions in Conflicts

Never before have the media played a more integral role in conflict management. At the same time, funding agencies and policymaking bodies have greater expectations for demonstrating impact and efficacy in this area.

To meet these growing needs, media development practitioners, donors, international broadcasters and methodologists have collectively authored the USIP PeaceWorks titled “Caux Guiding Principles." The Principles aim to improve monitoring and evaluation of media interventions in conflict zones. Such media interventions can consist of the media working to promote a particular message to influence public opinion, or they can be projects geared towards building the capacity of media organizations themselves.

On September 9, 2011 the Caux Guiding Principles were presented by those organizations who convened the unprecedented working session in Caux, Switzerland, where drafting of these Principles began.

Event Photos

Featuring

  • David Ensor, Keynote Address
    Director of Voice of America and
    former Director of Communications and Public Diplomacy at the U.S. Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan

9:00 a.m. Welcome and Framing the Day:  A new perspective on impact
Sheldon Himelfarb, Director, Center of Innovation: Media, Conflict and Peacebuilding, USIP

9:15 a.m. Keynote Address
David Ensor, Director, Voice of America

10:00 a.m. Presentation of "Caux Guiding Principles"
Moderator: Stefaan Verhulst, Chief of Research, Markle Foundation and Senior Research Fellow, Center for Global Communications Studies, Annenberg School for Communications, University of Pennsylvania

Caux Convenors:

  • Sheldon Himelfarb, United States Institute of Peace
  • Caroline Vuillemin, Fondation Hirondelle
  • Marjorie Rouse, Internews Network
  • Bruce Sherman, Broadcasting Board of Governors
  • Monroe Price, Center for Global Communication Studies, Annenberg School for Communication

11.00 a.m. Break

11:15 a.m. Reality Check:  The Promise and Perils of Media Intervention in Conflict
Moderator: Susan Abbott, Deputy Director of Program Development, Internews Network

  • Dr. Sina Odugbemi, Program head for the Communication for Governance & Accountability Program (CommGAP) at the World Bank
  • Dr. Tjip Walker,Senior Policy Analyst in the Policy, Planning and Learning Bureau's Office of Learning, Evaluation and Research at the US Agency for International Development (USAID)

12:15 p.m. Event Adjourned

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