Iraq’s Foreign Minister Dr. Ibrahim al-Jaafari addressed his country’s role in the Middle East, its battle against ISIS/ISIL, relations with the U.S., and the need for international assistance, in an event at the U.S. Institute of Peace on July 19. It was his only public appearance during a trip to Washington for meetings with the Global Coalition to Counter ISIL and an international pledging conference to raise funds for relief and reconstruction, as the Iraqi government works with allies to prepare for the massive undertaking of recapturing the country’s second-largest city, Mosul, from ISIS control.

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USIP's Ambassador Bill Taylor moderates the discussion with Iraqi Foreign Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari

As the government of Iraq fights a war against the extremist group, engagement with regional and international partners is essential in shaping the country’s future. Dr. Al-Jaafari, who has served as foreign minister since 2014, has worked with counterparts abroad to secure the military, humanitarian and development aid as well as the political support that Iraq needs to resolve the conflict, end political stagnation and assist the millions of citizens driven from their homes by the fighting. His address at USIP also touched on the imperative for reconciliation to resolve underlying conflicts and stabilize areas after they are liberated from ISIS control. Continue the conversation on Twitter with #JaafariUSIP.

Speakers

Nancy Lindborg, Opening Remarks
President, U.S. Institute of Peace 

Amb. Brett McGurk, Remarks
Special Presidential Envoy for the Global Coalition to Counter ISIL

Dr. Ibrahim Al-Jaafari
Foreign Minister, Republic of Iraq 

Amb. William B. Taylor, Moderator
Executive Vice President, U.S. Institute of Peace

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