Error message

The last event in our three-part series addressed the complex questions and challenges of sanctions in the Iran nuclear talks.

Since 2006, the United States has imposed more sanctions on Iran than any other country, so it may have to cede the most ground to get a nuclear deal in 2014. Over the years, Republican and Democratic administrations have issued at least 16 executive orders, and Congress has passed ten acts imposing punitive sanctions. What does Tehran want? What are the six major powers considering as incentives to cooperate? What isn’t on the table? The White House and Congress have imposed their own types of sanctions. What would either need to do to lift them? What difference would the various sanctions relief packages make to Iran?

On July 8, four panelists addressed the complex questions and challenges of sanctions in the Iran nuclear talks. It was third in a series of discussions hosted by an unprecedented coalition of eight Washington think tanks and organizations to coincide with the last rounds of negotiations. A rundown of the event is available on USIP’s The Iran Primer with a video, and on USIP’s blog The Olive Branch. The coalition includes the U.S. Institute of Peace, RAND, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the Arms Control Association, the Center for a New American Security, the Stimson Center, Partnership for a Secure America, and the Ploughshares Fund.

Speakers at the July 8th event included:

  • Suzanne Maloney
    Brookings Institution fellow and former State Department Policy Planning
  • Kenneth Katzman
    Congressional Research Service and former CIA analyst
  • Elizabeth Rosenberg
    Center for New American Security and former Treasury Department senior advisor
  • Robin Wright, Moderator
    Journalist and Author, U.S. Institute of Peace and Woodrow Wilson International Center

Related Publications

Halting Yemen’s War: U.S. Must Lead, Nobel Peace Laureate Says

Halting Yemen’s War: U.S. Must Lead, Nobel Peace Laureate Says

Monday, September 14, 2015

By: Fred Strasser

Tawakkol Karman, the Yemeni human rights activist who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2011, called on the United States to assume a bigger role in trying to revive a political process that might end the war now tearing her country apart. She urged the U.S. government to lead in pressing for a cease-fire and the transformation of Yemen’s militias into political parties.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Gender; Religion; Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

The Iran Nuclear Deal: Pitfalls and Promises

The Iran Nuclear Deal: Pitfalls and Promises

Friday, July 24, 2015

By: Cameron Glenn

The debate swirling around the historic nuclear deal reached by Iran and the world’s six major powers this month played out among two nuclear experts, a sanctions specialist and an Iran scholar during an event co-hosted by USIP at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars yesterday. The discussion outlined many of the issues that will top agendas in Washington and Tehran as lawmakers in both countries consider the agreement in the coming months.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Global Policy; Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

Democratic Breakthroughs: The Ingredients of Successful Revolts

Democratic Breakthroughs: The Ingredients of Successful Revolts

Friday, July 27, 2012

By: Ray Salvatore Jennings

Although each revolution is different, each successful case of democratic breakthrough shares common domestic and international influences. This report examines 11 cases of past successes at removing autocratic regimes and establishing elections. It then applies its findings to the emerging revolutions of the Arab Spring.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

View All Publications