Howard and Teresita Schaffer, authors of "How Pakistan Negotiates with the United States: Riding the Roller Coaster" (USIP Press, April 2011), and panelists discussed past, present and future U.S.-Pakistan negotiations and relations.

Read the event analysis, Negotiating the Pakistani-U.S. Relationship, One Step at a Time

 

Over the past 60 years, Pakistan-U.S. relations have been marked by highs of close cooperation and lows of deep bilateral estrangement.  Recent events and negotiations underscore the remarkable resilience  but also the vulnerability and volatility of the relationship.  With an interest in global security, the United States views Pakistan as a strategic partner, while Pakistan often looks to the United States as a counterweight to India and its neighbors.  What interests and influences shape how these two governments interact, negotiate and reach agreements, and what challenges do these countries face in the evolution of their relationship moving forwards?

Howard and Teresita Schaffer, authors of "How Pakistan Negotiates with the United States: Riding the Roller Coaster" (USIP Press, April 2011), and panelists, addressed these questions and discussed past, present and future U.S.-Pakistan negotiations and relations.  The latest volume in the Institute's series on cross-cultural negotiations.

Speakers:

  • Ambassador Howard B. Schaffer
    Professor, Georgetown University
  • Ambassador Teresita Schaffer
    Former Director, South Asia Program
    Center for Strategic and International Studies
  • Stephen Cohen
    Senior Fellow Foreign Policy, 21st Century Defense Initiative
    The Brookings Institution
  • Ambassador Akbar Ahmed
    Ibn Khaldun Chair of Islamic Studies
    American University
  • Richard Solomon, Introduction
    President, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Steve Riskin, Introduction
    Senior Program Office, Grants Program
    U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Moeed Yusuf, Moderator
    South Asia Advisor, Center for Conflict Analysis and Prevention
    U.S. Institute of Peace

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