As we enter a new decade, troubling developments around the rule of law continue to raise concerns for the future of fair and functioning societies. Since 2009, the World Justice Project (WJP) has documented these trends in its annual Rule of Law Index, now covering 128 countries and jurisdictions in the new 2020 edition. The 2020 Index provides citizens, governments, donors, businesses, and civil society organizations around the world with a comprehensive look comparing how these countries adhere to universal rule of law principles based on expert and household surveys.

USIP Rule of Law Event

Join USIP and the World Justice Project as we delve into the findings from the WJP Rule of Law Index 2020. WJP’s chief research officer will review important insights and data trends from the report. This will be followed by a panel discussion on the underlying factors behind the results, as well as the policy implications for those invested in strengthening the rule of law. 

Take part in the conversation on Twitter with #ROLIndex.

Speakers

David Yang, introduction
Vice President, Applied Conflict Transformation, U.S. Institute of Peace 

William Hubbard, introduction
Chairman of the Board of Directors, World Justice Project 

Sanjay Pradhan, keynote
Chief Executive Officer, Open Government Partnership 

Alejandro Ponce, report presentation
Chief Research Officer, World Justice Project

Robin Wright
Distinguished Scholar, U.S. Institute of Peace 

Elizabeth Andersen
Executive Director, World Justice Project

Maria Stephan
Director of Nonviolent Action, U.S. Institute of Peace

Margaret Lewis
Professor of Law, Seton Hall University

Philippe Leroux-Martin, moderator
Director for Governance, Justice and Security, U.S. Institute of Peace 

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