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The U.S. Institute of Peace hosted "The Future of the Syrian Revolution," a conversation with President Ahmad Jarba, head of the National Coalition for Syrian Revolutionary and Opposition Forces. The event was President Jarba’s first public address in Washington, DC.

Read the event coverage, Syrian Opposition Leader Jarba Appeals for U.S. Understanding, Weapons

Ambassador William B. Taylor and President Ahmad Jarba

The collapse of the Geneva talks in February stalled efforts to negotiate a peaceful solution to the conflict. The future of the revolution itself appears increasingly cloudy as the situation on the ground grows more chaotic. The Syrian government’s announcement that it would hold presidential elections in June – elections that President Bashar Assad is widely expected to win – limits chances for a political resolution to the crisis. Many, including the Syrian opposition, have called the elections a democratic charade.

Syrian Opposition Coalition leader Jarba discussed these dynamics and the role the international community could play, and assessed the delivery of humanitarian assistance as outlined by UN Security Council Resolution 2139.

Featured Speakers:

  • President Ahmad Jarba, Keynote
    National Coalition for Syrian Revolutionary and Opposition Forces
  • Ambassador William B. Taylor, Moderator
    Vice President for Middle East and Africa, U.S. Institute of Peace

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