While Nigeria has made strides in its democratic development, the 2019 elections were a step backward for Africa’s most populous country and biggest democracy. Historically low voter turnout signaled a deepening public distrust in Nigerian government and institutions. This public distrust, coupled with historical issues with electoral violence and intimidation, threatens to undermine the security and legitimacy of the democratic process and may cause reverberating consequences for other emerging democracies in Africa.

4th Republic

“4th Republic,” a new Nigerian political thriller directed by Ishaya Bako, interrogates the systemic problems at the heart of Nigeria’s democratic development. Following a fictional gubernatorial candidate who challenges the incumbent’s victory and investigates corruption allegations, the film explores the role of women in politics, the influence of patronage systems, the impacts of electoral intimidation, and the irregularity of the judicial system in Nigeria.

Join USIP and the Open Society Foundations on November 19 for a screening of “4th Republic.” As part of efforts to improve governance and address election-related violence in Nigeria, the film will be preceded by remarks from keynote speakers about Nigerian democracy today and its future trajectory.

Watch the trailer here. Take part in the conversation on Twitter with #4thRepublic.

Agenda

5:00pm - 6:00pm: Reception

6:00pm - 6:15pm: Welcoming Remarks

  • Nancy Lindborg,
    President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • L. Muthoni Wanyeki
    Regional Director, Africa Regional Office, Open Society Foundations

6:15pm - 6:45pm: Remarks

  • Prof. Attahiru Jega
    Former Chairman, Nigeria, Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC), Member, Nigeria Working Group on Peacebuilding and Governance 
  • Kate Henshaw
    Award-Winning Nigerian Actress

6:45pm - 8:30pm: Film screening of "4th Republic"

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