Afghan women’s tireless activism and advocacy has brought international attention to key issues at stake in their country’s ongoing peace process. As historic intra-Afghan negotiations proceed between the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and the Taliban, women are raising their voices to ensure the fundamental rights of all Afghans are protected in any political settlement, especially the advances made by women and girls in education, politics, civil society, and other sectors since 2001. 

Over the past 20 years, USAID and other donors have played a significant role supporting initiatives to empower Afghans. As negotiations continue, it is critical for the U.S. and the international community to reinforce their commitment to support Afghan women now and in a post-settlement period, and emphasize that any future Afghan government must respect the fundamental human rights of women and girls if they wish to receive donor support.

On October 7, USIP, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the U.S. Department of State held a discussion on Afghan women’s contributions, concerns, and their expectations from the international community.

Continue the conversation with #AfghanPeace.

Speakers 

Ambassador Kelley E. Currie
Ambassador-At-Large for Global Women’s Issues, Office of Global Women’s Issues, U.S. Department of State 

Jenny A. McGee
Associate Administrator for Relief, Response and Resilience, U.S. Agency for International Development

Karen L. Freeman
Deputy Assistant Administrator for Afghanistan and Pakistan, U.S. Agency for International Development

Hasina Safi
Acting Minister of Women’s Affairs, Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

Dr. Habiba Sarabi 
Afghan Government Negotiation Team Member

Hosna Jalil
Deputy Minister of Interior Affairs, Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

Palwasha Hassan
Executive Director, Afghan Women’s Educational Center

Scott Worden, welcoming remarks 
Director, Afghanistan and Central Asia Programs, U.S. Institute of Peace

Belquis Ahmadi, moderator
Senior Program Officer, Afghanistan, U.S. Institute of Peace 

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