This event is part of a series highlighting themes from “Imagine: Reflections on Peace,” a multimedia exhibit from USIP and the VII Foundation that explores the challenges of peacebuilding through an immersive look at societies that suffered — and survived — violent conflict.

As the world pays tribute to the victims of the 1995 Bosnian genocide in Srebrenica this month, efforts to hold accountable the perpetrators of atrocities committed during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina in the 1990s are still underway. Nearly three decades since the start of this tragic conflict, the pursuit of justice for these crimes has been sustained by the tireless efforts of investigators, journalists and academics that have worked to document evidence of atrocities. 

On July 19, USIP held a conversation on the importance of documentation in the pursuit of accountability for crimes committed in Bosnia and Herzegovina during the war — as well as lessons for current international accountability efforts for atrocities in other conflict-affected countries, such as Ukraine, Afghanistan and Ethiopia.

Speakers

Valerie Hopkins
Foreign Correspondent, The New York Times

Paul Koring 
Attorney; Former Foreign Correspondent, The Globe and Mail

Emina Muzaferija
Researcher; Former Staff Member, U.N. International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals

Gerard Toal 
Professor, School of Public and International Affairs, Virginia Tech; Author of “Bosnia Remade: Ethnic Cleansing and Its Reversal” 

Ajla Terzic
Journalist; Author of “This Could Have Been a Simple Story”

Philippe Leroux-Martin, moderator
Director, Governance, Justice and Security, U.S. Institute of Peace; Author of “Diplomatic Counterinsurgency: Lessons from Bosnia and Herzegovina” 

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