On September 13, 2011, the Latin American and Hemispheric Studies Program of George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs and USIP hosted a meeting featuring the Honorable Michaelle Jean, special envoy to Haiti for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and former governor general of Canada. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On September 13, 2011, the Latin American and Hemispheric Studies Program of George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs and the United States Institute of Peace hosted a meeting featuring the Honorable Michaelle Jean, special envoy to Haiti for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and former governor general of Canada. 

Madame Jean discussed her recent trip to Haiti, including visits to Jacmel, Léogâne and Cap Haïtien where numerous historical sites need protection.  Dr. Robert Maguire, professor of the Practice of International Affairs at the Elliott School and chair of the USIP's Haiti Working Group, moderated the discussion.  Robert Perito, director of USIP's Haiti Program, introduced Madame Jean.  USIP works to promote reconciliation and reconstruction in Haiti through on-the-ground conflict resolution training and with regular public forums on Haiti in Washington, DC.  

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