For four years, His Holiness the Dalai Lama has met with youth leaders from conflict-affected regions for an intergenerational exchange at his compound in Dharamsala, India through the Generation Change Fellows Program at the United States Institute of Peace (USIP). This year, USIP Generation Change Fellows will participate in a virtual exchange with His Holiness. These youth leaders will share their experiences and perspectives on building peace in their communities, and they will pose questions that invite His Holiness to share his on compassion and resilience.

On October 13, His Holiness the Dalai Lama, USIP President and CEO Lise Grande, and USIP Generation Change Fellows convened for two days of conversation focusing on gender equality and education for the heart and mind.

Take part in the conversation on Twitter with #DalaiLamaUSIP.

Session 1: Gender Equality

October 13, 11:30pm-12:30am EDT

  • Lise Grande, welcoming remarks 
    President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama

Sharing of Stories and Q&A with USIP Generation Change Fellows

  • Lise Grande, moderator            
  • Nyachangkuoth Rambang Tai
    USIP Generation Change Fellow, South Sudan 
  • Ashar Omer 
    USIP Generation Change Fellow, Afghanistan
  • Mithila Hore
    USIP Generation Change Fellow, Bangladesh
  • Muqimi Muborak 
    USIP Generation Change Fellow, Tajikistan 

Discussion on Impact

  • Gharsanay Amin
    USIP Generation Change Fellow, Afghanistan

Closing Remarks 

  • Lise Grande

Session 2: Education for the Heart and Mind

October 14, 11:30pm-12:30am EDT

  • Lise Grande, welcoming remarks 
    President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama

Sharing of Stories and Q&A with USIP Generation Change Fellows

  • Lise Grande, moderator    
  • Sophia Santi 
    USIP Generation Change Fellow, Venezuela 
  • Tania Rosas
    USIP Generation Change Fellow, Colombia
  • Nicholas Songora
    USIP Generation Change Fellow, Kenya
  • Faten Khalfallah
    USIP Generation Change Fellow, Tunisia

Discussion on Impact

  • Soukaina Hamia 
    USIP Generation Change Fellow, Morocco

Closing Remarks 

  • Lise Grande

Please note this session will be broadcast live on October 14 at 11:30pm EDT; local Dharamshala time on October 15 at 9:00am (GMT+5:30).

Related Publications

How the Taliban’s Hijab Decree Defies Islam

How the Taliban’s Hijab Decree Defies Islam

Thursday, May 12, 2022

By: Belquis Ahmadi;  Mohammad Osman Tariq

The Taliban continued this week to roll back Afghan women’s rights by decreeing women must be fully covered from head to toe — including their faces — to appear in public. This follows decrees limiting women’s ability to work, women’s and girls’ access to education and even limiting their freedom of movement. Afghan women are rapidly facing the worst-case scenario many feared when the Taliban took over last summer. While the Taliban justify these moves as in accordance with Islam, they are, in fact, contradicting Islamic tradition and Afghan culture as the group looks to resurrect the full control they had over women and girls when they ruled in the 1990s.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

GenderHuman RightsReligion

Protecting the Participation of Women Peacebuilders

Protecting the Participation of Women Peacebuilders

Tuesday, March 8, 2022

By: Negar Ashtari Abay, Ph.D.;  Kathleen Kuehnast, Ph.D.

Worsening violence against women is often a precursor to — and early outcome of — the rise in coups and authoritarianism that have made recent headlines. Not only does protecting women’s participation in public life and decision-making go hand-in-hand with democracy, but the former is actually a precondition for the latter. As we mark International Women’s Day in 2022, we would do well to remember that global efforts to prevent violent conflict and sustain peace are significantly undermined when women are deterred from access to participation and full leadership without fear of reprisals and violence. 

Type: Analysis and Commentary

GenderPeace Processes

Peaceful Masculinities: Religion and Psychosocial Support Amid Forced Displacement

Peaceful Masculinities: Religion and Psychosocial Support Amid Forced Displacement

Wednesday, March 2, 2022

By: Negar Ashtari Abay, Ph.D.;  Andrés Martínez;  Carolina Buendia Sarmiento

The number of people displaced globally due to conflict and violence nearly doubled between 2010 and 2020 from 41 million to 78.5 million, the highest number on record. Forced displacement, within and across national borders, exposes persons to stressful events and trauma, making psychosocial support a critical part of successful integration in new communities and societies. Those forcibly displaced include women and girls, men and boys, and gender and sexual minorities.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

GenderReligion

View All Publications