The Atlantic Council and the U.S. Institute of Peace welcomed the President of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, His Excellency Mohammad Ashraf Ghani, on the occasion of his first official visit to Washington, D.C. since being sworn in as president on September 21, 2014. The public address, with questions and answers from the invite-only audience and via Twitter, took place on March 25, 2015 at USIP headquarters in Washington, D.C.

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Media Guidance for event coverage

Continue the conversation on Twitter with #AskGhani.

Speakers

Nancy Lindborg
President, U.S. Institute of Peace

Stephen J. Hadley
Chairman, Board of Directors, U.S. Institute of Peace
Executive Vice Chair, Board of Directors, Atlantic Council

H.E. Mohammad Ashraf Ghani
President, Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

Frederick Kempe
President & CEO, Atlantic Council

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