With more than 100 million people, Ethiopia is one of Africa’s most important and populous countries.  Recent changes in political leadership have heralded widely welcomed political and economic reforms, at home and abroad. Yet amid the positivity, Ethiopia faces notable challenges: many reforms remain transitory, the country’s broader national stability is being tested, and its internal politics disputed. Given the historically strong bilateral relationship with Ethiopia, how the United States responds and supports the transition in Ethiopia will be hugely significant for the country’s future.

During this crucial period of reform and uncertainty in Ethiopia, the U.S. Institute of Peace hosted a distinguished panel who reflected on their experiences as serving diplomats in Ethiopia, and identified what lessons are relevant to engagement with Ethiopia today.

Participants

Ambassador Johnnie Carson, opening remarks
Senior Advisor to the President, U.S. Institute of Peace

Ambassador Marc Baas,
U.S. Ambassador to Ethiopia, 1992-1994

Ambassador David Shinn
U.S. Ambassador to Ethiopia, 1996-1999; Adjunct Professor, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University

Ambassador Aurelia Brazeal
U.S. Ambassador to Ethiopia, 2002-2005

Ambassador Donald Booth
U.S. Ambassador to Ethiopia, 2010-2013

Susan Stigant
Director, Africa Program, U.S. Institute of Peace

Aly Verjee, moderator
Senior Advisor, Africa Program, U.S. Institute of Peace

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