Weeks after President Trump’s inauguration, Pakistan has sent its former foreign secretary, Aizaz Chaudhry, as its new ambassador in Washington. Amb. Chaudhry takes up his post as relations between Pakistan and Afghanistan have reached a new nadir. Tensions are high on the border and extremists are attacking on both sides. U.S. frustration with Pakistan’s Afghanistan policy has grown. At USIP, Amb. Chaudhry discussed Pakistan’s relationship with Afghanistan and opportunities for U.S.-Pakistani cooperation to promote peace and stability amid the Afghan conflict.

For years, Pakistan’s relations with the United States and Afghanistan have been damaged. Washington and Kabul have concluded that Pakistan has not uniformly opposed the operations on its territory of Afghanistan’s Taliban and its allies, such as the Jalaluddin Haqqani militant network. Pakistan, which conducts military offensives against some militant groups, says its efforts are under-appreciated.

Now the faces in U.S.-Pakistani diplomacy have changed. Can the arrival of a new U.S. administration and a senior, new Pakistani ambassador offer any new possibilities for cooperation, rather than mutual frustration, over Afghanistan?

In his first public forum as ambassador in Washington, Aizaz Chaudhry spoke to Pakistan’s outlook on U.S.-Pakistan relations, the possibilities for cooperation on Afghanistan, and the situation in South Asia.  

Speakers

Ambassador Aizaz Ahmad Chaudhry
Pakistan Ambassador to the United States

Moeed Yusuf
Associate Vice President, Asia Center, U.S. Institute of Peace

Related Publications

Could Pakistan’s Protests Undercut Taliban and Extremism?

Could Pakistan’s Protests Undercut Taliban and Extremism?

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

By: James Rupert

Tens of thousands of ethnic Pashtuns have held mass protests in Pakistan in the past three months, demanding justice and better governance for their communities. The largely youth-led protests forged an organization, the Pashtun Tahafuz Movement (“tahafuz” means “protection”), that has broadened its goals to include democracy and decentralization of power in Pakistan. The movement reflects demands for change among the roughly 30 million Pashtuns who form about 15 percent of Pakistan’s population, the country’s second-largest ethnic community.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Nonviolent Action; Violent Extremism

Devolution of Power in Pakistan

Devolution of Power in Pakistan

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

By: Syed Mohammed Ali

Passage of the eighteenth amendment to Pakistan’s constitution in 2010 was rightly hailed as a major accomplishment. Not only did it devolve significant powers from the central government to the provinces, it also mandated the formation of local governments to bring government closer to the people. It took half a decade for the provinces to set up local governments—and real decision-making authority and financial resources have been even slower to arrive. In this Special Report, Syed Mohammad Ali takes stock of Pakistan’s devolution process and why its success is critical to the long-term prospects of democracy and the cultivation of new generations of democratic leaders.

Democracy & Governance

View All Publications