Trends in global terrorism change every year. From fragile states to urban megacities, data shows how many societies are impacted by violence. But, how does this data help prevent and counter violent extremism?

Data on where attacks occur and the countries that are most impacted by violence remains critical for policymakers, practitioners, and researchers looking to prevent and counter violent extremism. The findings of the sixth annual edition of the Global Terrorism Index (GTI) provide data on the evolving trends of global terrorism that are useful for policy, programming and research.

Produced by the Institute for Economics & Peace (IEP), and informed by data collated by the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism at the University of Maryland, the GTI provides a comprehensive summary of the key global trends in terrorism from 2000 to 2017.

Join the U.S. Institute of Peace and IEP for a discussion on the GTI’s findings and relevance, including the extent to which data helps shape policy. Speakers will explore how data impacts decision-making and shapes policy, practice, and research.

Speakers

Richmond Blake
Director of Policy and Advocacy, Mercy Corps

Michelle Breslauer
Director, Americas Program, Institute for Economics & Peace

Leanne Erdberg
Director Countering Violent Extremism, United States Institute of Peace

Elizabeth (Liz) Hume
Alliance for Peacebuilding, Vice President and Acting CEO

Erin Miller
Global Terrorism Database Manager, National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism 

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How Civil Society Can Help Prevent Violence and Extremism

Thursday, June 6, 2019

By: Leanne Erdberg ; Bridget Moix

Editor’s Note: Congress charged the U.S. Institute of Peace with convening the Task Force on Extremism in Fragile States. Following the public launch of the Task Force’s final report, four groups of experts came together to discuss how to implement the report’s recommendations. This four-part series will discuss the findings from these strategy sessions. Part one summarizes expert discussion on how civil society actors are preventing violent extremism and building resilience in their communities and practical ways the U.S. and other international actors can more effectively interact with civil society to bolster its role in prevention.

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Leanne Erdberg on the Psychology Behind Terrorism

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Nearly 20 years after 9/11, determining the profile of someone who is going to join a terrorist group remains a deeply challenging effort. For too long we have looked at simple explanations— like poverty or lack of education—for why people join violent movements. Erdberg discusses a new project to investigate the psychology and neuroscience that motivates people to resort to extremism.

Violent Extremism

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Tuesday, May 7, 2019

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After losing its last territory in Syria on March 23, 2019, the Islamic State quickly reclaimed global attention with the Easter bombings in Sri Lanka on April 21 and a video tape of its reclusive leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, on April 29. The jihadi movement is now shifting focus to its ISIS branches, or “provinces,” in Africa, Asia and Europe. Baghdadi signaled ISIS’s expansion by formally embracing two Sunni extremist groups in Mali and Burkina Faso. But the Islamic State’s human core—more than 100,000 fighters and their families, including children—remains clustered in the rubble of its former “caliphate” in both Syria and Iraq. In Syria, they are detained in makeshift prisons, a hospital and refugee-style camps in the desert of northeastern Syria. USIP Senior Fellow Robin Wright made a rare tour of northeastern Syria to interview men and women who were part of the ISIS caliphate and to assess the risks posed by the post-caliphate crisis.

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