The President of Tunisia, His Excellency Beji Caid Essebsi, gave remarks and took questions at the U.S. Institute of Peace on May 20, during his first visit to the United States since taking office in December. As Tunisia works to keep its largely peaceful transition on track, President Essebsi addressed the challenges Tunisia is confronting and the opportunities it offers.

Beji-Caid-Essebsi

Recent violence in North Africa, including renewed unrest in Libya to the south, has increased religious and political tensions in the region, making security a priority for Tunisia. But Tunisia’s democratic gains and stability also hinge on economic growth and educational initiatives that could advance Tunisia's reform agenda and secure a more prosperous future for its citizens. President Essebsi’s message on these issues will focus on the unprecedented opportunity that democratic Tunisia offers to the United States to forge a durable strategic partnership in the region based on shared values and interests. 

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