Since the Afghan Taliban’s return to power, Pakistan continues to back them while not officially recognizing the Taliban government. Yet major issues have emerged between the two sides. The anti-Pakistan insurgency Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) has been emboldened by the Afghan Taliban’s rise to power and has stepped up violence against Pakistani security forces. The Afghan Taliban also remain noncommittal on action against the TTP’s Afghanistan-based leadership and cadres — instead appearing to provide the TTP with sanctuary and substantial support. Meanwhile, the Afghan Taliban have publicly challenged the Afghanistan-Pakistan border, specifically the colonial-era Durand Line, with tensions mounting after Taliban fighters dismantled sections of Pakistan’s border fence.

On February 17, USIP held a discussion on the future of Pakistan’s relationship with the Afghan Taliban. The conversation examined how Pakistan is assessing the challenges along its western border, the increasing threat of the TTP and the next era of Pakistan’s security challenges.

Take part in the conversation on Twitter with #USIPPakistan.

Speakers

Asfandyar Mir  
Senior Expert, South Asia, U.S. Institute of Peace

Elizabeth Threlkeld  
Director, South Asia Program, Stimson Center

Kamran Yousuf 
Journalist and Analyst, Express Tribune 

Ambassador Rick Olson, moderator
Senior Advisor, Asia Center, U.S. Institute of Peace

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