On April 6, USIP convened a panel of regional experts to discuss how Afghanistan’s immediate neighbors – Pakistan, Iran, and the bordering Central Asian Republics – view the present situation and impending security transition in Afghanistan, and what their role and policies are likely to be between now and 2014, and beyond.

 

As the 2014 security transition in Afghanistan approaches, multiple tracks need to be pursued to ensure sustainable peace in the country. A regional solution is often touted as a critical element in achieving such a peace. Without collaborative buy-in for such a solution, however, the potential increases that Afghanistan’s neighbors will play a destabilizing role in the country given their own domestic and international objectives. Despite much debate on this issue, the core interests policies, and views of Afghanistan’s neighboring states are still not well understood.

On April 6, USIP convened a panel of regional experts for a conversation on how Afghanistan’s immediate neighbors – Pakistan, Iran, and the bordering Central Asian Republics – view the present situation and impending security transition in Afghanistan, and what their role and policies are likely to be between now and 2014, and beyond. The panelists discussed measures the U.S. and other allies can take to incentivize policies of cooperation and collaboration from these neighbors with the ultimate objective of promoting stability in Afghanistan. USIP works on the ground in Afghanistan and Pakistan to promote the nonviolent resolution of conflicts and build local capacity to prevent and address disputes through nonviolent means.

This event featured the following speakers:

  • Abubakar Siddique, panelist
    Senior News Correspondent
    Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty
  • Shahrbanou Tadjbakhsh, panelist
    Associate Researcher, Peace Research Institute Oslo
    Professor MPA/Sciences Po (Paris)
  • Alireza Nader, panelist
    Senior International Policy Analyst
    RAND Corporation
  • Moeed Yusuf, moderator
    South Asia Adviser
    United States Institute of Peace

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