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The Asia Foundation launched its 11th annual Survey of the Afghan People — the most in-depth and continuous measurement of Afghan citizens’ opinions nationwide. The Taliban’s capture in September of the city of Kunduz adds to the many challenges faced by the government of President Ashraf Ghani and CEO Abdullah Abdullah—and this year’s survey is the first in the series to reflect public perceptions under their administration. USIP and Asia Foundation experts discussed the findings for the Washington release on November 19.

Read the event coverage, In Afghanistan, an End to Optimism?

Survey
Pictured left to right, Andrew Wilder, Zach Warren, Timor Sharan

The survey is based on face-to-face interviews conducted each June with a nationally representative sample that in 2015 numbered more than 9,500 Afghan citizens across all 34 of the country’s provinces. It offers concrete data about public perceptions of a broad range of issues: security, the economy, essential services, governance and political participation, corruption, justice, gender equality and others. This year’s survey includes several new questions on youth issues, reconciliation with the Taliban, the Islamic State (ISIS), landmines, government care for disabled persons, and access to social media on mobile phones.

The Asia Foundation's series of annual surveys in Afghanistan provides an unmatched barometer of Afghan public opinion over time. Taken together, the surveys are a resource for policymakers in government, the international community and the broader Afghan public as they navigate a difficult landscape, seeking a more peaceful and prosperous future for Afghanistan and the region. Join the conversation about the survey on Twitter with #AfghanSurvey.

David D. Arnold
President, The Asia Foundation

Timor Sharan
Program Management Director in Afghanistan

Zach Warren
Survey and Research Director in Afghanistan

Andrew Wilder, Moderator
Vice President, Asia Programs, U.S. Institute of Peace

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