In conflict-affected countries around the world, women risk their lives to build peace, promote justice and foster more inclusive, resilient societies — efforts that are foundational to global peace and security. And yet, too often women remain overlooked and excluded from formal peace processes and broader peacebuilding efforts.

The U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) Women Building Peace Award, now in its second year, celebrates extraordinary women from conflict-affected and fragile regions working to build peace.

The 2021 award finalists were selected from more than 30 countries across Africa, Asia and Latin America. Each of them embodies the courage, commitment and ability to affect profound change that this award symbolizes. In the face of violent conflict and uncertainty, the 2021 finalists have advanced stability in their countries across many dimensions of peacebuilding: expanding access to justice, protecting the environment, building relationships across communal divides and providing a voice for women, youth and other marginalized groups.

On October 20, 2021 USIP honored these heroic finalists and announced the recipient of the award. In addition to honoring the awardee and all the finalists, this year USIP payed special tribute to all Afghan women.

Join the conversation on Twitter with #WomenBuildingPeace.

Speakers

Lise Grande
President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace

Kamissa Camara
Senior Visiting Expert for the Sahel, U.S. Institute of Peace

Nancy LindborgWomen Building Peace Council Honorary Chair
President and CEO, The David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Megan Beyer, Women Building Peace Council Co-Chair
Principal, Megan C Beyer Associates

Marcia Myers Carlucci, Women Building Peace Council Co-Chair
Chair, Board of Trustees at National Museum of Women in the Arts

Nelufar Hedayat
Journalist, Filmmaker

Michelle Howard
U.S. Navy Admiral (Ret.)

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