To better understand the experiences of young diaspora in the United States, integrate their voices into policy dialogues, and encourage youth engagement in peacebuilding, the United States Institute of Peace in partnership with Search for Common Ground and Nomadic Wax, organized the 2010 Youth Diaspora Conference. The Conference was an opportunity for young diaspora from different countries of origin to share their experiences and learn how they can creatively engage in peacebuilding. An evening reception celebrated the conclusion of the 2010 Youth Diaspora Conferece, featuring a keynote address by Grace Akallo.

America is the home of many cultures, with more and more people immigrating every year.  The diaspora of these cultures keep strong connections with their countries of origin, and the experiences they have while living in the United States will impact their home countries.  Many of these diaspora come from countries with a history of violent conflict. To ensure that they have a positive influence back home, organizations like the U. S. Institute for Peace (USIP) and Search for Common Ground have been convening people for dialogue and policy development. Unfortunately, until now, young people have been notably absent from these forums.

As a means of better understanding the experiences of young diaspora in the United States, integrating their voices into policy dialogues, and encouraging youth engagement in peacebuilding, the United States Institute of Peace in partnership with Search for Common Ground and Nomadic Wax Productions co-sponsored the 2010 Youth Diaspora Conference. The Conference was an opportunity for young diaspora to share their experiences and to learn how they can creatively engage in peacebuilding.

Explore Further

Related Publications

Is Insecurity Undermining the Coronavirus Response? Evidence from Nigeria

Is Insecurity Undermining the Coronavirus Response? Evidence from Nigeria

Tuesday, August 18, 2020

By: Aly Verjee

In the United States, there is no shortage of public opinion data on nearly every question imaginable. But in Nigeria, Africa’s most populous country, such data is more scarce and policymakers often lack detailed insights into citizen perceptions and concerns. Now, new evidence from USIP-commissioned surveys conducted in May and July 2020 of more than 10,000 Nigerians has found new relationships between violent conflict and the coronavirus response. The data shows that victims of violence are more likely to distrust the Nigerian government’s response to coronavirus.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Health

COVID-19 and Conflict: Nigeria

COVID-19 and Conflict: Nigeria

Thursday, May 28, 2020

By: Oge Onubogu

As Africa’s most populous democracy and largest economy, Nigeria’s ability to mitigate the spread of the coronavirus within its own borders has broader implications for the entire continent. Meanwhile, the virus threatens to exacerbate the country’s existing security challenges, which in turn make an effective pandemic response more difficult. In this #COVIDandConflict video, our Oge Onubogu looks at how the Nigerian government has addressed the virus and what potential takeaways the response to COVID-19 could have for tackling the country’s epidemic of violence.

Type: Blog

Global Health

Nigeria: The Response to Coronavirus is an Opportunity for Reform

Nigeria: The Response to Coronavirus is an Opportunity for Reform

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

By: Nigeria Working Group on Peacebuilding and Governance

Well before the coronavirus emerged, a large majority of Nigerians felt their country was “going in the wrong direction.” Polling shows Nigerians feel the government has struggled to improve the living standards of the poor and is managing the economy badly. Today, while the public health response to head off the pandemic dominates attention, calls from prominent members of Nigerian civil society have renewed debates over wider questions of economic, social, and political reform. In this article, members of the Nigeria Working Group on Peacebuilding and Governance express both their hopes and concerns—in the context of the coronavirus—for Africa’s most populous country.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance; Global Health

Nigeria Should Build Peace Like it Fights Coronavirus

Nigeria Should Build Peace Like it Fights Coronavirus

Monday, April 6, 2020

By: Oge Onubogu

Nigerian leaders struggling to reduce violence in the country’s myriad conflicts should take some lessons—from their own response to the coronavirus. While Nigeria’s COVID-19 ordeal is still unfolding, its eventual casualties unknown, the Nigeria Center for Disease Control (NCDC) and several governors have modeled the ways to reduce catastrophic outbreaks. The simple existence of a national prevention center with sustained resources has proven critical. Key officials have applied vital principles, acting at the first sign of danger and keeping the public widely informed. These are precisely the ways to confront Nigeria’s other national plague—of violence.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Fragility & Resilience; Peace Processes; Global Health

View All Publications