Toni Morrison and The Brilliant Art of Peace

Toni Morrison and The Brilliant Art of Peace

Monday, August 12, 2019

By: Abiodun Williams

I had the good fortune to meet Toni Morrison at the United Nations in June 2002. She delivered the inaugural lecture in a series of public lectures established by fellow Nobel laureate Kofi Annan, then secretary-general of the United Nations. Annan established the lectures to bring different perspectives to the U.N. and to strengthen the sense of community among U.N. staff and diplomats of member states.

Monitoring Cease-fires is Getting Harder: Greater Innovation is Required

Monitoring Cease-fires is Getting Harder: Greater Innovation is Required

Thursday, August 8, 2019

By: Aly Verjee

Far from helping resolve conflict, flawed cease-fires and cease-fire monitoring may well contribute to significantly increased mistrust between the parties to that conflict. The consequences may be even more damaging; as cease-fires are often one of the first objectives a mediator attempts to achieve, in the eyes of the combatants, early failure may more broadly damage the viability, or the perception of viability, of external action to effectively resolve the conflict.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Peace Processes

Tunisia, Stable Under Essebsi, Now Must Recruit Youth

Tunisia, Stable Under Essebsi, Now Must Recruit Youth

Monday, July 29, 2019

By: James Rupert

Tunisia, the single democracy to emerge from the Middle East’s 2011 political revolts, suddenly must choose a new leader following the death of 92-year-old President Beji Caid Essebsi. Essebsi was the country’s first freely elected president and helped lead its transition away from decades of authoritarian rule. His death accelerates a test for this young democracy—its first political succession under its 2014 constitution.

Youth

People Power Can Boost the Afghan Peace Process

People Power Can Boost the Afghan Peace Process

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

By: Maria J. Stephan

I recently visited Afghanistan for the first time since serving at the U.S. Embassy in Kabul from 2009-2011. When I was last there, the fighting was intense and peace seemed far off. My days were spent working long hours at the embassy, and my nights were spent working on a book about violent and nonviolent resistance, a project which changed my life. Today, talks between the Taliban and the U.S.—and recently between the Taliban and Afghan leaders—have renewed hope for peace after decades of conflict. What role can civil resistance play amid the steady stream of violence in Afghanistan?

Nonviolent Action

Venezuelan Youth Lead Nonviolent Campaigns for Change

Venezuelan Youth Lead Nonviolent Campaigns for Change

Thursday, July 18, 2019

By: Aubrey Cox; Nilaya Knafo

As the Americas’ biggest political and refugee crisis has mushroomed, Venezuela’s massive youth population faces an agonizing choice: to endure the conflict and the privations of a collapsed economy, or to seek economic survival and a better life abroad. With a recent surge of people fleeing the country, more than 4 million Venezuelans now are refugees, the United Nations reported last month. Still, a strong core of youth—nonviolent protest leaders, humanitarian workers and grassroots organizers—is working on peaceful ways to restore stability and democracy.

Youth

Pakistan’s Participation Puzzle: A Look at the Voting Gender Gap

Pakistan’s Participation Puzzle: A Look at the Voting Gender Gap

Thursday, July 18, 2019

By: Ali Cheema; Sarah Khan; Shandana Khan Mohmand; Anam Kuraishi; Asad Liaqat

The Global Gender Gap Index ranked Pakistan in 2016 as the second lowest country in the world for gender equality. Women’s political participation is recognized as an essential component of gender equality and in Pakistan the gender gap in participation is particularly high. Ensuring gender equality in political participation matters: A recent survey conducted by these authors finds that, at least in some public policy domains in Pakistan’s big cities, the issues that matter to women are different from the issues that matter to men. This demonstrates that greater gender equality in electoral participation could substantively change what issues are represented in the political arena.

Democracy & Governance

Lessons from the Dalai Lama: Looking Past My World

Lessons from the Dalai Lama: Looking Past My World

Monday, July 8, 2019

By: Nour Darwish

Nour Darwish is a Generation Change fellow, medical student, and a part-time primary school educator from Libya who works with youth to understand the importance of promoting peace. She was the lead organizer of the first TedxYouth event in Libya and works as a project manager for a youth-led NGO called Makers of Hope. She is one of 30 young civil society leaders from 12 nations facing violent conflict whom USIP gathered in 2018 for training and mentorship with the Nobel peace laureate and spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama.

Youth

To Build Peace, Afghans Revive an Old Definition of Manhood

To Build Peace, Afghans Revive an Old Definition of Manhood

Tuesday, June 25, 2019

By: Asma Ebadi; James Rupert

Across Afghanistan, Rafiullah Stanikzai has spent thousands of hours with young men, learning how 40 years of war has warped Afghans’ ancient culture and corrupted their notions of how, simply, to be a man. Stanikzai is working to reverse that change, because stabilizing any country from war requires not only political negotiations, like those between U.S. diplomats and the Taliban. Any sustainable peace must also change enough hearts and minds that a people can return to settling disputes without guns and grenades.

Gender