This micro-course provides an overview of the strategic process of building peace when long-term violence has burdened a conflict-affected community. It describes the seven necessary components that should be considered to make peacebuilding more effective.

The Ninawa discussions in Iraq. Photo courtesy of USIP
The Ninawa discussions in Iraq. Photo courtesy of USIP

Course Overview & Key Objectives

By the end of this micro-course, participants will be able to achieve the following objectives:

  • Describe the role of strategic peacebuilding when preparing for peace and why it's important;
  • Identify the seven considerations to take into account in the peacebuilding process; and
  • Identify the seven considerations to take into account in the peacebuilding process. and

Overview Video

Click on the video below for an overview of the course.

If you cannot play the video, click here to download it.

Agenda

Section 1 - Introduction

Introduces the role of strategic peacebuilding in preparing for peacebuilding and why it is important.

Section 2 - Conflict and Conflict Transformation

Introduces the curve of conflict and discusses the move toward conflict transformation.

Section 3 - Components of Strategic Peacebuilding

Identifies two considerations to take into account when preparing for peacebuilding.

Section 4 - Components of Strategic Peacebuilding Continued

Discusses several considerations seen in strategic peacebuilding and how it applies to preparing for peacebuilding.

Section 5 - Burdens of Long-Term Violence

Explains the impact long-term violence has on peacebuilding.

Section 6 - Quiz

Checks your understanding and retention of key terms, concepts, and ideas presented in this course.

Section 7 - Reflections

Allows you to share what you have learned and read what others have learned from this course and how these skills and knowledge will impact the work we do.

Instructors and Guest Experts

Instructor

  • George Lopez, Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., Professor Emeritus of Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame

Latest Publications

As Protests Continue in the Street, Iraq Reaches a Crossroads

As Protests Continue in the Street, Iraq Reaches a Crossroads

Friday, November 8, 2019

By: Sarhang Hamasaeed

Tens of thousands of Iraqis have been protesting in Baghdad and southern provinces against the failure of the Iraqi government and the political class in delivering basic services, providing jobs, fighting corruption, and more. Iraqi security forces and armed groups reportedly linked to Iran have used lethal force in response to the protests, leaving over 260 dead and over 10,000 injured. As the protests have progressed, demands have expanded to include calls for regime change, the resignation of Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi, early elections, pushing back against Iranian influence, and accountability for killing peaceful protesters.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance; Fragility & Resilience

A Month After U.S. Withdrawal, What is the State of Play in Syria?

A Month After U.S. Withdrawal, What is the State of Play in Syria?

Thursday, November 7, 2019

By: Mona Yacoubian

In the month since President Trump’s October 6 phone call with Turkish President Erdogan and the announced U.S. withdrawal from northeast Syria, the picture on the ground has changed immensely. Moscow has emerged as the key power broker in Syria. The Kurds, looking for protection from Turkish forces, are in Russian-brokered talks with the Assad government. These discussions could pave the way for an expanded Syrian government presence in the northeast for the first time in years. Successive agreements with Turkey negotiated first by the United States (October 17) and then by Russia (October 22) to halt Ankara’s fighting with the Kurds have been marred by violations.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

What Has the U.S. Got Against Peace Talks?

What Has the U.S. Got Against Peace Talks?

Wednesday, November 6, 2019

By: Johnny Walsh

Last month, U.S. President Donald Trump withdrew from the Afghan peace process, closing off for the time being a rare opening to resolve a long, stagnant, and unpopular war. Whatever one thinks of the specifics of the deal that the U.S. representative at the talks, Zalmay Khalilzad, had nearly finalized with the Taliban, the episode was a perfect demonstration of the conflicted, often self-defeating view of peace agreements that mires U.S. foreign policy.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Peace Processes

Can Policy Catch up to the Golden Age of Terrorism Research?

Can Policy Catch up to the Golden Age of Terrorism Research?

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

By: Leanne Erdberg ; Fouad Pervez

Meanwhile, researchers are increasingly understanding the dynamics that drive people to join terrorist groups—unpacking the numerous, complex reasons, and shining light on the local sociopolitical dynamics, something the media is covering more regularly. This new wave of research has a multiplicity of focus areas and employs rigorous methods to offer workable insights on violent extremism. It’s time for policy to catch up to the research.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Violent Extremism

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