This online course explores the impact of conflict on gender identity, norms, and roles and how gender equality can create transformative opportunities for peace.

Center for Gender and Peacebuilding
Center for Gender and Peacebuilding. Photo credit: USIP

International organizations and national governments are increasingly recognizing that in order to ensure long term stability, reconciliation and peace processes need to be inclusive of all peoples within a society. This course will answer the question, “why gender matters.” Gender is a socio-cultural construction that defines the roles and expectations that a given society ascribes to men and women, boys and girls, and sexual and gender minorities. Gender identities are therefore learned, highly malleable and particularly affected during times of violent conflict, violent extremism or natural disaster. Through a series of mixed media presentations, case scenarios and exercises, participants will explore how conflict impacts gender identities, and also how gender expectations can influence violence and create opportunities for peaceful resolution.

Course Overview

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the diversity of gender identities, and that gender is not a simple binary between the biological sex of female and male men and women.
  • Learn how gender roles are affected by unexpected or prolonged violence in society, and learn central concepts and basic frameworks of gender and peacebuilding.
  • Explore the varying approaches and current practices toward ensuring gender inclusivity in peacebuilding activities. Examine international frameworks and national policies that promote gender equality and women’s empowerment.
  • Examine international frameworks and national policies that promote gender equality and women's empowerment.

Overview Video

Click on the video below for an overview of the course.

If you cannot view the video, click here.

Agenda

Section 1: Gender in Peacebuilding

Provides a basic overview of gender inclusivity in peacebuilding, key terms, concepts, and USIP's Gender Inclusive Framework.  

Section 2: Gender Inclusivity in Practice

Explores in more depth the history and background of each of the gender inclusive approaches, provides stories of past projects or situations where a gender lens provided a clearer understanding of the problem, and increases understanding of each of the gender inclusive approaches and how they can impact projects and policies.

Instructors and Guest Experts

Instructors

Guest Experts

  • Dean Peacock, Co-founder and Executive Director, Sonke Gender Justice
  • Dr. Gary Barker, President and CEO, Promundo
  • Dr. Virginia "Ginny" Bouvier, Senior Advisor, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Jacqueline O'Neill, Director, Inclusive Security
  • Sanam Naraghi-Anderlini, Co-founder and Executive Director, International Civil Society Action Network
  • Carla Koppell, Distinguished Fellow, Georgetown University
  • Atifete Jahjaga, Former President of Kosovo
  • Susan Markham, International Gender and Development Advocate

Related Publications

Preventing Sexual Exploitation and Abuse by Male Peacekeepers

Preventing Sexual Exploitation and Abuse by Male Peacekeepers

Wednesday, September 2, 2020

By: Jessica Anania; Angelina Mendes; Robert U. Nagel

Sexual exploitation and abuse by United Nations peacekeeping forces first came to international attention more than a quarter century ago. Despite numerous UN policy responses, the problem persists, harming individuals, jeopardizing missions, and undermining the credibility and legitimacy of UN peacekeeping operations. This report addresses the question of why more progress has not been made in preventing these violations and draws attention to ways in which prevention efforts can be strengthened and made more effective.

Type: Special Report

Gender

America can build peace better—if it includes women.

America can build peace better—if it includes women.

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

By: Amanda Long; Kathleen Kuehnast, Ph.D.

The United States is making a publicly little-noted stride this month to strengthen its response to the violent crises worldwide that have uprooted 80 million people, the most ever recorded. Officials are overhauling America’s method for supporting the “fragile” states whose poor governance breeds most of the world’s violent conflict. Yet the proven new approach—helping these countries meet their people’s needs and thus prevent violence and extremism—will fall short if its implementation fails to include and support women in every step of that effort. Fortunately, an earlier reform to U.S. policy offers practical lessons for doing so.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Fragility & Resilience; Gender

COVID Will Lead to More Child Marriage—What Can Be Done?

COVID Will Lead to More Child Marriage—What Can Be Done?

Wednesday, August 12, 2020

By: Joud Monla-Hassan; Mona Yacoubian

The impact of the COVID pandemic continues to be felt around the world, with economies shuttered and political systems increasingly strained. Another of the downwind effects of the pandemic—one that has not been leading the headlines—is that it is expected to lead to a sharp increase in early child marriage. In many countries, when crisis hits, early child marriage increases exponentially.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Human Rights; Gender

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