Publications

USIP Publications and Tools provide the latest analysis of international developments and policy recommendations on world affairs issues, particularly the prevention and resolution of conflict.

Latest Publications and Tools

September 2014
By
Georgia Holmer with Fulco van Deventer
What happens when community policing—a strategy that promotes collaboration between the police and a community to ensure safety and security—is implemented in transitional societies, in marginalized communities, or to prevent violent extremism or to engage women in providing community-level security? To ensure that they are not doing more harm than good, security, gender, and peacebuilding practitioners must both expand their understanding of policing methodologies and related assumptions and reconcile sometimes competing objectives.
September 2014
By
Erica Gaston with Nadwa al-Dawsari
This research is part of a three-year United States Institute of Peace (USIP) project that explores how Yemen’s rule of law and local justice and security issues have been affected in the post-Arab Spring transition period. A complement to other analytical and thematic pieces, this large-scale mapping provides data on factors influencing justice provision in half of Yemen’s governorates. Its goal is to support more responsive programming and justice sector reform. Field research was managed by Partners-Yemen, an affiliate of Partners for Democratic Change.
September 2014
By
Georgia Holmer
Unlike other counterterrorism strategies, countering violent extremism (CVE) focuses on preventing individuals from being recruited into or joining violent extremist groups. CVE is a complex endeavor, largely because the reasons individuals become involved in extremist violence are in themselves complex and the dynamics are unique to each conflict. Using Kenya as an example, and drawing on observations from a recent visit, the author explores how promoting a more nuanced understanding of radicalization can help reach those who are at risk of being pushed and pulled into extremist violence.
September 2014
Insights highlights major questions on the research and practice of peace and conflict, to more than 10,000 subscribers from around the world.
August 2014
By
William A. Byrd
Afghanistan faces a fiscal crisis due in large part to worsening domestic revenue shortfalls. Averting this crisis will require strong leadership from the new Afghan government that will be replacing the Karzai administration. The country’s revenue system and collections need to be improved, corruption reduced, new revenue sources developed and expenditures cut. More international aid also is needed to help stabilize Afghanistan’s budget as the government undertakes these reforms.
August 2014
By
Anita Aaron, Danielle Lane and Ariana Barth
In 2007, the UN Secretary-General's Policy Committee defined peacebuilding as follows: "Peacebuilding involves a range of measures targeted to reduce the risk of lapsing or relapsing into conflict by strengthening national capacities at all levels for conflict management, and to lay the foundations for sustainable peace and development. Peacebuilding strategies must be coherent and tailored to specific needs of the country concerned, based on national ownership, and should comprise a carefully prioritized, sequenced, and therefore relatively narrow set of activities aimed at achieving the above objectives."
August 2014
By
Robert Perito and Tariq Parvez
Violence is escalating in Pakistan, both in its megacities and along the border with Afghanistan—from terrorism, to secessionist insurgency, to sectarian conflict, to ethnic turf wars. The police station and the police who staff it, despite their historic role as a symbol of government authority and responsibility for public order, are woefully ill prepared and ill equipped to meet these challenges. This report, part of a project to increase Pakistan’s capacity to combat terrorism, explores the role police stations could and should play and suggests definitive steps to that end.  
July 2014
By
Bruce “Ossie” Oswald
More than three hundred defense groups provide security to local communities in states around the world. While it is true that such groups can be a resource-efficient means for states to provide law and order to their communities, it is also true that they can worsen security.
July 2014
By
Frances Z. Brown
Thirteen years into the current international campaign in Afghanistan and five years after the U.S.-led military surge of 2009, the drawdown of foreign troops and civilian-military installations is under way. The military struggle and contest for governance between the insurgency and the Kabul government has not been decisively resolved. How aid is delivered to the country’s more remote areas is changing dramatically. It is time for donors to rethink their approaches to local governance and development. Three areas are key: delivery of services, links between citizens and the government, and measuring progress. This report assesses lessons learned from donor efforts from 2009 to 2014 and looks to how donor strategies need to change in future efforts.
July 2014
By
Richard Albright
Overcoming Pakistan's many challenges, and meeting the development needs of its people, requires working through the institutions of Pakistani governance if sustainable impacts are to be achieved. U.S. aid, if offered consistently and in support of systemic institutional reform, can have a valuable catalytic role to assist and incentivize these efforts.

Publication Types and Tools

Through the United States Institute of Peace Press, USIP publishes peer-reviewed books on the prevention, management, and resolution of violent conflict. These books meld theory and practice and are intended to inform those who make policy, analyze international conflict, and practice peacebuilding.

A range of material for practitioners in the field, including handbooks such as the Peacemaker’s Toolkit series on mediation, reference works such as Peace Terms, and guidelines on civilian-military operations.

Intended for a broad audience, these four-page briefs provide topical news analysis and policy recommendations related to USIP’s mission and work.

In-depth background and analysis on topics that represent the full range of USIP’s work. Reports explore specific conflicts, offer comparative analysis across conflicts, evaluate peacebuilding efforts, and present new approaches to conflict through a variety of lenses, such as economics, gender, media and technology, religion, rule of law, and security sector reform.

USIP’s magazine-style newsletter features the Institute’s work around the world as well as developments in Washington, DC.

Short, timely, policy-relevant reports. These accessible reports offer policymakers, practitioners, and scholars a distillation of expert research, lessons learned, and problem solving across the full gamut of conflict areas and themes that USIP covers.

Other Publication Types