Articles and Publications

USIP Articles, Publications and Tools provide the latest analysis of international developments and policy recommendations on world affairs issues, particularly the prevention and resolution of conflict.

Latest Articles & Analysis

November 2014
By
Scott Smith
The results of the 10th annual Asia Foundation survey of the Afghan people provides some indication that a government that seeks to govern with greater inclusivity, respect for the rule of law and attention to justice might also help strip the insurgency of any remaining legitimacy and strengthen the government’s negotiating hand as international troops withdraw. This will be the major challenge of Afghanistan’s new, reform-oriented government.
November 2014
By
Maria J. Stephan
A Filipino activist fighting human trafficking, a member of a watchdog group in Uruguay, an Egyptian peacebuilder, an anti-corruption campaigner from Ghana, a Dutch freedom-of-expression activist and an American tech- and civic-engagement guru – these are just a few of 47 civic leaders who met in Turkey this month to discuss ways of supporting civil society in an era of increasing government repression.
November 2014
(Washington) - The United States Institute of Peace Board of Directors has selected Nancy Lindborg to be the Institute’s new president. Lindborg, who has devoted most of her career to issues of transition, democracy and civil society, conflict and humanitarian response, will be the fifth president...
November 2014
By
Rachel Sullivan and Susan Stigant
Reconciliation and peacebuilding in the Central African Republic will require a national dialogue supported by a grassroots movement, according to the Catholic Archbishop of Bangui Dieudonné Nzapalainga. He spoke at USIP alongside a Muslim imam and Protestant minister about the trio’s efforts to end a brutal two-year-old conflict that reportedly has killed more than 5,000 and forced more than 830,000 people from their homes.
November 2014
By
Aparna Ramanan and Hind Kabawat
After a long bus ride set against the mountains of Syria, we finally arrived at a school outside Hatay in southern Turkey. Once there, a smiling, middle-aged woman greeted us at the gate: “Welcome to our school.”
November 2014
Between October 21 and 30, 2014, Joyce Kasee and Hamid Khan were short-term elections observers with the Carter Center’s Elections Observations Mission in Tunisia. The Carter Center works globally to advance democratic elections and governance consistent with universal human rights.
November 2014
By
Manal Omar
As we commemorate the sacrifices made by our veterans this week, let’s take a moment and recall that Veteran’s Day is a day of hope and to recognize our soldiers for the hopeful work they do for civilians around the globe. 
November 2014
By
Jonas Claes and Claire Elder
A Nairobi audience of journalists, election officials, and civil society gathered to hear the results of field work conducted in 10 counties across Kenya. The study gauged popular attitudes about the factors that explained the absence of widespread violence during Kenya’s 2013 Presidential elections. Conventional wisdom among international observers indicated that these elections presented a ‘prevention success,’ since the widespread violence of the 2007-08 elections had not been repeated. But the research delivered a surprise.
November 2014
By
Virginia M. Bouvier
On Friday, November 7, President Juan Manuel Santos wrapped up a five-day diplomatic marathon for peace to the capital cities of Madrid, Brussels, Berlin, Lisbon, Paris, and London. He met with heads of state, kings, princes, and the leaders of the European Union and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), where Colombia’s membership is under consideration. Santos garnered widespread political support for Colombia’s peace process with Colombia’s largest insurgency, the FARC, and the incipient process with the ELN across the continent and across the political spectrum. He also secured promises of economic assistance from Germany and support for a post-conflict fund from the European Union.
November 2014
By
Paul Hughes
On November 11th, America will observe Veteran’s Day, so named in 1954 by President Eisenhower. For 35 years, Americans had celebrated Armistice Day in recognition of the end of World War I, and as a day dedicated to the “cause of world peace.” Following the massive mobilizations and sacrifices of World War II and the Korean War, however, Congress renamed Armistice Day as Veteran’s Day, and by so doing honored the millions more who had sacrificed for the common good.

Latest Publications and Tools

November 2014
The United States Institute of Peace works to prevent, mitigate, and resolve violent conflict around the world. USIP does this by engaging directly in conflict zones and by providing analysis, education, and resources to those working for peace. Created by Congress in 1984 as an independent, nonpartisan, federally funded organization, USIP’s more than 300 staff work at the Institute’s D.C. headquarters, and on the ground in the world’s most dangerous region.
November 2014
Insights highlights major questions on the research and practice of peace and conflict, to more than 10,000 subscribers from around the world.
November 2014
Libya currently faces political deadlock and deteriorating security situation. Trust in government institutions has fallen to an all-time low, and political elites are beginning to use armed groups to force political action during sustained deadlock, creating parallel security structures that undermine the state.
November 2014
By
Trent Ruder
Although not a magic bullet, incentive programming can help shape dialogue with the new Afghan administration. What are incentive programs? How do issues such as stakeholder participation, Afghan capacity and consequences of success or failure affect policy decisions for incentive programs? In addressing these questions, this PeaceBrief points the way to more effective incentive programming.
November 2014
The Center for Applied Research on Conflict (ARC) was formed in 2013 to improve the effectiveness of field-based peacebuilding and conflict resolution practices. Experiences in countries where violence persists or reignites despite large-scale efforts to manage and reduce conflict, challenge peacebuilders to consider critically what works and what doesn’t. The mission of ARC is to conduct rigorous, evidence-based research to assess strategies and models of intervention intended to prevent, mitigate, resolve, and recover from, violent conflict. 
November 2014
In March 2013, Uhuru Kenyatta won election as Kenya’s president and was sworn into office without much of the violence experienced by the country during elections in 2007-8. Although the election was calm, Kenya still faces high rates of corruption and the rising instability in certain regions, especially near its border with Somalia.
November 2014
By
Claire Elder, Susan Stigant and Jonas Claes
To prevent a recurrence of the widespread violence that left 1,100 dead and 650,000 displaced in the aftermath of the December 2007 Kenyan elections, Kenya and the broader international community initiated a multifaceted peacebuilding effort in the lead-up to the country’s March 2013 elections.
Type
November 2014
Following the war between Israel and Hamas in the summer of 2014, and the collapse of Israeli and Palestinian negotiations preceding the hostilities, tensions within and between Israeli and Palestinian societies are high, the prospect of a resumption of violent conflict looms, and new challenges exist to the prospects for a negotiated settlement.  Against this backdrop, USIP works at both the policy and grassroots levels to prepare the ground for peace.  The Institute/USIP develops and supports programs and initiatives that work to prevent a deterioration in conditions on the ground, and that can serve to reinvigorate public support for diplomatic and other non-violent initiatives  
November 2014
Pakistan continues to face multiple internal and external threats to peace, despite the fact that it completed its first-ever peaceful transfer of power from one civilian government to the next in 2013. The Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N) government came into office with an ambitious agenda of economic development, peace negotiations with Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan militants, and renewed relations with Pakistan’s neighbors. These efforts have stalled or reversed in a number of areas, however, and the government today faces protests from domestic political opponents. Meanwhile, Pakistan continues to face multiple internal and external threats to peace. A common structural factor in many of these conflicts is the weakness of the Pakistani state and its inability — or reluctance — to prevent and contain the actions of all violent sub-state actors. However, despite its weaknesses, leadership from the Pakistani state also remains central to addressing most of the significant drivers of conflict. 
November 2014
By
Arif Rafiq
The violence across the Middle East has energized sectarian militant networks on both sides of the conflict in Pakistan. This report gives an overview of the history of conflict between Sunni Deobandi and Shia militant and political organizations in Pakistan and offers warnings about further radicalization there and its effects on the politics of the state.

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