On February 3, 2009, USIP's Center of Innovation for Media, Conflict and Peacebuilding joined the Independent Television Service (ITVS) to convene Media as Global Diplomat, a day-long conference that brought together many of the top thinkers in U.S. public diplomacy and strategic communication with independent film and media producers to identify innovative paths forward in the increasingly important effort to improve mutual understanding between the United States and other countries through communication and media. An online archive of the event was created to serve as a valuable resource for the day’s events. Users can watch video of the entire day’s proceedings, as well as review supporting materials and other information.

Media as Global Diplomat Online Archive

On February 3, 2009, USIP joined International Television Service (ITVS) to convene Media as Global Diplomat, a day-long conference that brought together many of the top thinkers in U.S. public diplomacy and strategic communication with independent film and media producers to identify innovative paths forward in the increasingly important effort to improve mutual understanding between the United States and other countries through communication and media.

This pages serves as a valuable online archive of the day’s events.  Users can watch video of the entire day’s proceedings, as well as review supporting materials and other information.

Media as Global Diplomat was moderated by veteran newsman Ted Koppel and met at Washington, D.C.’s Newseum, a cutting-edge interactive museum dedicated to news and communication in the 21st Century.

Speakers at the event included Kathy Bushkin Calvin of the United Nations Foundation, Ambassador Edward Djerejian of the Baker Institute, Abderrahim Foukara of Al Jazeera International, former Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs James Glassman, Andrew McLaughlin of Google, James Zogby of the Arab American Institute, Carol Giacomo of The New York Times and others.

From its inception, Media as Global Diplomat was meant to be an inclusive event – inclusive of multiple stakeholders, inclusive of disparate perspectives, and inclusive of audience participation from around the globe.  The organizers met that goal in part by coordinating the participation of nearly two-dozen bloggers around the world who write on international affairs, public diplomacy and other issues.  Many other participants stayed involved by using the popular online technology Twitter.  Together, these blogs and tweets joined the voices of nearly 300 participants at the Newseum to create a robust and diverse conversation.

Latest Publications

Kathleen Kuehnast on the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize Winners

Kathleen Kuehnast on the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize Winners

Thursday, December 20, 2018

By: Kathleen Kuehnast, Ph.D.

Highlighted by the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize award to Dr. Denis Mukwege and Nadia Murad—advocates for survivors of wartime sexual violence—the issue of sexual abuse has gained international recognition. USIP’s Kathleen Kuehnast attended the ceremony, saying, “People were standing in solidarity to what they were hearing. We can no longer be indifferent about this type of criminal activity.”

Gender

Ukraine’s Elections Could Turn Violent—This is How to Prevent It

Ukraine’s Elections Could Turn Violent—This is How to Prevent It

Thursday, December 20, 2018

By: Jonas Claes; Artem Miroshnichenko

Ukraine is facing a busy election season in 2019, with presidential elections on March 31 and parliamentary elections scheduled for October, amid a challenging security context. Many Ukrainians expect turbulent and “dirty” elections with increased tension during the campaign periods, and between Election Day and the likely presidential run-off.

Electoral Violence

What Does the U.S. Troop Withdrawal Mean for Syria?

What Does the U.S. Troop Withdrawal Mean for Syria?

Wednesday, December 19, 2018

By: Mona Yacoubian

On Wednesday, the White House announced that it will “fully” and “rapidly” withdraw the U.S. military presence in Syria, where approximately 2,000 U.S. troops have been stationed in the northeastern, Kurdish-controlled part of the country, near its border with Turkey. USIP’s Mona Yacoubian examines the implications of the troop withdrawal and its broader impact on the Syria conflict.

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Reforming the U.S.-Sudan Relationship Requires a Regional Strategy

Reforming the U.S.-Sudan Relationship Requires a Regional Strategy

Wednesday, December 19, 2018

By: Aly Verjee; Payton Knopf

On November 7, the U.S. Department of State announced long-awaited plans outlining a path to better relations with Sudan, “designed to expand our bilateral cooperation, facilitate meaningful reforms to enhance stability in Sudan, and achieve further progress in a number of areas of longstanding concern.” USIP’s Aly Verjee and Payton Knopf discuss the initiative, and identify where broader U.S. regional objectives could cohere, including in the war in Yemen.

Fragility & Resilience; Global Policy

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