USIP's Alex Thier and Bill Taylor argue why leadership of civilian assistance is necessary for success in Afghanistan, and lay out the best options to move forward.

PEace Brief: Establishing Leadership on Civilian Assistance to Afghanistan

Summary

USIP's Alex Thier and Bill Taylor argue why leadership of civilian assistance is necessary for success in Afghanistan, and lay out the best options to move forward.

About the Authors

This USIPeace Briefing was written by Ambassador William B. Taylor Jr., vice president of the Center for Post-Conflict Peace and Stability Operations at the U.S. Institute of Peace and has served as U.S. assistance coordinator to Afghanistan, Iraq, and the former Soviet Union. J Alexander Thier is director for Afghanistan and Pakistan programs at USIP, and co-author and editor of "The Future of Afghanistan" (USIP, 2009).

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