Articles and Publications

USIP Articles, Publications and Tools provide the latest analysis of international developments and policy recommendations on world affairs issues, particularly the prevention and resolution of conflict.

Latest Articles & Analysis

December 2014
By
Viola Gienger
Inbar Shaked Vardi and Mouran Ibrahim are 14 years old but speak in a way that many adults in the maelstrom of the Middle East can’t muster – of Arab-Jewish “shared living,” a step even beyond mere co-existence. When their school, the flagship Max Rayne campus of the Hand in Hand Jewish-Arab bilingual school network in Israel, was attacked recently, their outlook on the world was tested once again.
December 2014
By
William Byrd
It was yet another big international meeting on Afghanistan, one of a dozen or so high-profile diplomatic extravaganzas at the ministerial or head-of-state level since January 2002. But the meticulous efforts to plan these meetings, which are set months if not years in advance, are sometimes mocked by the capricious unfolding of events.
December 2014
The U.S. Institute of Peace mourns the passing of Robert B. Oakley, a distinguished diplomat who was instrumental in policy thinking on Somalia in the early 1990s, including during two tours at the Institute.
December 2014
By
Viola Gienger
Widening political rifts, increasing militant attacks and plunging oil revenues are escalating the risks of more widespread violence in Nigeria’s upcoming elections, according to experts who played roles ranging from international organizations to the militant group Boko Haram, during a daylong PeaceGame exercise.
December 2014
Bill Taylor, a former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine who currently serves as USIP’s acting president, just returned from a visit to Kyiv and discusses the prospects for the country’s new reform-oriented government.
December 2014
By
Paul Kirby and Kathleen Kuehnast
There's more will than ever before to fight sexual violence in conflict, but the world can't stop what it doesn't understand.
December 2014
By
Georgia Holmer
Vigilantes have become vital in the country's fight against Boko Haram. But is there a way to ensure they're not also making things worse?
December 2014
By
Colin Cleary
The victory for pro-Western parties in Ukraine’s recent parliamentary election offers a historic chance for Ukraine to break out of the cycle of poor governance and corruption that has plagued it since independence – and made it vulnerable to Russian aggression.  Perhaps the most encouraging result of the balloting is that dedicated young reformers, such as a group I met in Kirovograd in south-central Ukraine, will insist on institutional reform and rapid progress and give the upcoming parliament a very different tone.  
December 2014
Following his testimony before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Middle East and North Africa last week, USIP’s Steven Heydemann reflected on the reactions of the subcommittee members and a near consensus agreement that only an integrated Iraq-Syria strategy will be successful in defeating ISIS.
November 2014
By
Scott Smith
The results of the 10th annual Asia Foundation survey of the Afghan people provides some indication that a government that seeks to govern with greater inclusivity, respect for the rule of law and attention to justice might also help strip the insurgency of any remaining legitimacy and strengthen the government’s negotiating hand as international troops withdraw. This will be the major challenge of Afghanistan’s new, reform-oriented government.

Latest Publications and Tools

December 2014
The United States Institute of Peace works to prevent, mitigate, and resolve violent conflict around the world. USIP does this by engaging directly in conflict zones and by providing analysis, education, and resources to those working for peace. Created by Congress in 1984 as an independent, nonpartisan, federally funded organization, USIP’s more than 300 staff work at the Institute’s D.C. headquarters, and on the ground in the world’s most dangerous regions
December 2014
By
William A. Byrd & Javed Noorani
Mining companies in Afghanistan are wantonly exploiting the country’s mineral resources with little or no taxes and royalties going to the government. Contracting of mines has been susceptible to political influence, there is little accountability and sometimes conflicts with local communities have led to violence and deaths. This Peace Brief examines these problems and offers some recommendations to improve the situation.
November 2014
Insights highlights major questions on the research and practice of peace and conflict, to more than 10,000 subscribers from around the world.
November 2014
Libya currently faces political deadlock and deteriorating security situation. Trust in government institutions has fallen to an all-time low, and political elites are beginning to use armed groups to force political action during sustained deadlock, creating parallel security structures that undermine the state.
November 2014
By
Trent Ruder
Although not a magic bullet, incentive programming can help shape dialogue with the new Afghan administration. What are incentive programs? How do issues such as stakeholder participation, Afghan capacity and consequences of success or failure affect policy decisions for incentive programs? In addressing these questions, this PeaceBrief points the way to more effective incentive programming.
November 2014
The Center for Applied Research on Conflict (ARC) was formed in 2013 to improve the effectiveness of field-based peacebuilding and conflict resolution practices. Experiences in countries where violence persists or reignites despite large-scale efforts to manage and reduce conflict, challenge peacebuilders to consider critically what works and what doesn’t. The mission of ARC is to conduct rigorous, evidence-based research to assess strategies and models of intervention intended to prevent, mitigate, resolve, and recover from, violent conflict. 
November 2014
In March 2013, Uhuru Kenyatta won election as Kenya’s president and was sworn into office without much of the violence experienced by the country during elections in 2007-8. Although the election was calm, Kenya still faces high rates of corruption and the rising instability in certain regions, especially near its border with Somalia.
November 2014
By
Claire Elder, Susan Stigant and Jonas Claes
To prevent a recurrence of the widespread violence that left 1,100 dead and 650,000 displaced in the aftermath of the December 2007 Kenyan elections, Kenya and the broader international community initiated a multifaceted peacebuilding effort in the lead-up to the country’s March 2013 elections.
Type
November 2014
Following the war between Israel and Hamas in the summer of 2014, and the collapse of Israeli and Palestinian negotiations preceding the hostilities, tensions within and between Israeli and Palestinian societies are high, the prospect of a resumption of violent conflict looms, and new challenges exist to the prospects for a negotiated settlement.  Against this backdrop, USIP works at both the policy and grassroots levels to prepare the ground for peace.  The Institute/USIP develops and supports programs and initiatives that work to prevent a deterioration in conditions on the ground, and that can serve to reinvigorate public support for diplomatic and other non-violent initiatives  
November 2014
Pakistan continues to face multiple internal and external threats to peace, despite the fact that it completed its first-ever peaceful transfer of power from one civilian government to the next in 2013. The Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N) government came into office with an ambitious agenda of economic development, peace negotiations with Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan militants, and renewed relations with Pakistan’s neighbors. These efforts have stalled or reversed in a number of areas, however, and the government today faces protests from domestic political opponents. Meanwhile, Pakistan continues to face multiple internal and external threats to peace. A common structural factor in many of these conflicts is the weakness of the Pakistani state and its inability — or reluctance — to prevent and contain the actions of all violent sub-state actors. However, despite its weaknesses, leadership from the Pakistani state also remains central to addressing most of the significant drivers of conflict. 

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