Articles and Publications

USIP articles, publications, and tools provide the latest news, analysis, research findings, practitioner guides, and reports from the conflict zones that are at the center of the Institute’s work to prevent and reduce violent conflict.

Latest Articles & Analysis

September 2016
By
Rachel Sullivan
On a cool Friday morning in Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic, the conference room is silent for the first time in days. Expert presentations on disarmament and security sector reform, followed by lively debates, had filled the room since Wednesday afternoon. Now, only the air conditioning hums as a diverse group of mid- and-senior level officials and civic leaders—gathered by the U.S. Institute of Peace—pore over findings from citizen consultations held in communities around the country. They are men and women, Muslims and Christians. Their positions in ministries and civil society groups in the capital, Bangui, make them part of the political elite, a class that has historically governed the country without input from its constituents. Now, after decades of violence and instability, that’s beginning to change.
September 2016
By
Jonas Claes and Scofield Muliru
With elections coming up next year in Liberia and Kenya, the time for early and sustained efforts to prevent clashes is now. Forthcoming USIP research shows that domestic institutions hold the key: election commissions, the police and, above all, political leaders. Any international support to those institutions and leaders must now move from plans to action in order to achieve any desired impact amid rising tensions.
September 2016
By
USIP Staff
Four days of talks last week restarted Myanmar’s peace process almost a year after a Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement was signed by some but not all of the country’s armed groups. The process, known as the 21st Century Panglong Conference, or Union Peace Conference, is intended to convene every six months and aims to end the decades-long conflicts between and among the Myanmar army and an array of rebel groups. Vanessa Johanson, the Myanmar country director for the U.S. Institute of Peace, examines the results.
September 2016
By
Fred Strasser
After four tours with the U.S. Marines in Iraq, Representative Seth Moulton, a first-term Democrat from Massachusetts, remains focused on the country’s development and its current battle against the ISIS extremist group, and he said he has concluded that its fundamental problems are political. A military strategy that fails to address Iraq’s political weaknesses ensures that American troops—about 5,000 of whom have returned to the country—will be back again five years after ISIS is defeated, Moulton said in an address at the U.S. Institute of Peace. 
September 2016
By
Manal Omar
This month, the world's unprecedented refugee crisis, and the traumas of the greater Middle East that are fueling it, will dominate the United Nations' annual General Assembly session. World leaders will hold extraordinary meetings, including a White House-hosted Leaders' Summit on Refugees, to grapple with a web of violent conflicts, failed and fragile states, and the resulting humanitarian disaster of more than 60 million people worldwide living as refugees.
September 2016
By
USIP Staff
Governors from northern Nigeria, where the U.S. military is helping quell the Boko Haram militant group, will convene at the U.S. Institute of Peace for the second time this October to agree on civilian actions they can take to address the root causes of violent extremism and help ensure that efforts to stabilize this vital region will stick. Former U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Johnnie Carson, a USIP senior advisor helping organize the gathering, said Nigerian governors are some of the most powerful figures in a country that ranks as the continent’s second-largest economy and a political, communications and petroleum giant.
September 2016
By
Viola Gienger
Three former high-ranking officials in the State Department, the Pentagon and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) urged the next presidential administration to commit more attention and resources to preventing the kinds of violent conflicts that are roiling the Middle East and other regions today and spilling over into neighboring countries, Europe and the United States. Former Deputy Secretary of State Bill Burns, Under Secretary of Defense Michele Flournoy and USAID Assistant Administrator Nancy Lindborg said it would take discipline, focus and coordination to address the problem of “fragile states” before they erupt into further crises that take countless lives and cost exponentially more to resolve.
September 2016
By
Virginia M. Bouvier
Colombian rebel troops are heading to decommissioning centers and minors are set to leave guerrilla ranks on Sept. 10, as the government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC-EP) begin implementing their peace accord ahead of an Oct. 2 plebiscite on the deal. 
September 2016
Princeton N. Lyman, senior advisor to the president at USIP, testifies before the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights and International Organization.
September 2016
By
Viola Gienger
A peace plan for South Sudan that was intended to end three years of fighting in the world’s newest nation has failed largely because it “depends on the cooperation of the very antagonists who brought about the current civil war,” former U.S. Special Envoy to Sudan and South Sudan Princeton Lyman told a House Foreign Affairs subcommittee today. Lyman, a senior advisor at USIP, also said a proposal to add 4,000 United Nations troops to the existing contingent will succeed only if it has a separate, specific mandate to prevent attacks on civilians.

Latest Publications and Tools

September 2016
By
Maria J. Stephan
The Fragility Study Group is an independent, non-partisan, effort of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, the Center for a New American Security and the United States Institute of Peace. The chair report of the study group, U.S.
September 2016
By
Rachel Kleinfeld
The Fragility Study Group is an independent, non-partisan, effort of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, the Center for a New American Security and the United States Institute of Peace. The chair report of the study group, U.S.
September 2016
The first peaceful and democratic election in the Central African Republic (CAR) in February 2016 opened the way for accelerating efforts to stabilize a country beset by violence since gaining independence from France in 1960.
September 2016
By
Amanda H. Blair, Nicole Gerring and Sabrina Karim
Sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) can undermine long-term state stability and security even after states have transitioned out of violent conflict.
September 2016
By
Virginia M. Bouvier and Lisa Haugaard
Las desapariciones forzadas son un legado de medio siglo de conflicto armado interno en Colombia.
September 2016
By
Tariq Parvez
The Islamic State, or Daesh, has moved its influence beyond Iraq and Syria, formally establishing its Khorasan branch in Central Asia in January 2015.
September 2016
By
Lauren Van Metre
The Fragility Study Group is an independent, non-partisan, effort of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, the Center for a New American Security and the United States Institute of Peace. The chair report of the study group, U.S.
September 2016
By
Sarah Chayes
The Fragility Study Group is an independent, non-partisan, effort of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, the Center for a New American Security and the United States Institute of Peace. The chair report of the study group, U.S.
September 2016
By
James Cohen, Joyce Kasee Mills, Leanne McKay
The Maghreb countries of Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia face threats to their borders from transnational illicit networks, such as terrorist groups and criminal organizations.
September 2016
By
Ernest Ogbozor
Informal security actors such as vigilantes play a variety of roles in African communities. Research has tended to focus on the negative impact of informal security providers, but these groups have an essential role in a community’s safety and security.

USIP Articles and Publications by Category