Paul Hughes

Senior Advisor for International Security and Peacebuilding

Paul Hughes is the senior advisor for international security and peacebuilding at USIP. Hughes has previously served as USIP’s chief of staff and director of Nonproliferation and Arms Control Program. He also served as the executive director of the Quadrennial Defense Review Independent Panel, executive director of the Congressional Commission on the Strategic Posture of the United States, and as the director of Iraq programs in the Center for Post-Conflict Peace and Stability Operations.

Prior to joining USIP, he served as an active duty Army colonel and as the Army's senior military fellow to the Institute for National Security Studies of the National Defense University. From January to August 2003, Hughes served as a senior staff officer for the Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance and later with the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq. During that time he developed several policy initiatives, such as the disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration of the Iraqi military. As the director of national security policy on the Army staff from 2000-2002, he developed and provided policy guidance for the Army in numerous areas, such as arms control, weapons of mass destruction, missile defense, emerging nontraditional security issues, and crisis prediction. From 1996 to 2000, he served in the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) as deputy director of the Office for Humanitarian Assistance and Anti-Personnel Landmine Policy, where he led the OSD participation in crafting U.S. landmine policy and the DOD response to Hurricane Mitch, the Turkish earthquakes, and the Mozambique floods.

Hughes holds two master's degrees of military arts and sciences and a bachelor's degree in sociology from Colorado State University. His awards include two Defense Superior Service Medals, three Bronze Star Medals, four Meritorious Service Medals, the Joint Service Commendation Medal, four Army Commendation Medals, and several campaign and service ribbons.

Multimedia

Publications

Abiodun Williams, Bruce W. MacDonald, Daniel Brumberg, Dorina Bekoe , Moeed Yusuf, Paul Hughes
September 7, 2010
The bimonthly Prevention Newsletter provides highlights of CAP's conceptual work, its region specific work aimed at helping to prevent conflicts in Africa, the Middle East, South and Northeast Asia, and the special projects on genocide prevention and nonproliferation. It also provides Over the Horizon thinking on trends in different regions, as well as CAP events, working groups and publications.
Abiodun Williams, Bruce W. MacDonald, Daniel Brumberg, Dorina Bekoe , Paul Hughes
July 1, 2010
The bimonthly Prevention Newsletter provides highlights of CAP's conceptual work, its region specific work aimed at helping to prevent conflicts in Africa, the Middle East, South and Northeast Asia, and the special projects on genocide prevention and non-proliferation. It also provides Over the Horizon thinking on trends in different regions, as well as CAP events, working groups and publications.
Paul Hughes
May 25, 2005
USIPeace Briefing analyzing the motivation behind the insurgency, how to deal with the insurgency, and the lessons learned.

Articles & Analysis by this Expert

July 31, 2014
By:
Paul Hughes
(Washington) – The National Defense Panel delivered its review of the Department of Defense 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) to Congress today. The Congressionally mandated report, “Ensuring a Strong Defense for the Future,” was written at the request of the Department of Defense. The executive director of the project was Colonel (Ret.). Paul Hughes, a senior advisor at the United States Institute of Peace and was written in partnership with LMI, a non-profit government consulting firm. COL. Hughes also led the 2010 review of the QDR. 

In the News

July 31, 2014

Paul Hughes, a senior advisor at the United States Institute of Peace and was written in partnership with LMI, a non-profit government consulting firm. COL. Hughes also led the 2010 review of the QDR. The consensus conclusion of the report is that ...