Jon Temin

Director of Africa Programs

Jon Temin is the director of USIP’s Africa programs, which focuses on helping to end Sudan, South Sudan and Somalia’s multiple conflicts and prevent new violence.  Mr. Temin also follows developments elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa.  He travels to Sudan, South Sudan, and other countries in the region frequently to assess developments and meet with government officials, civil society leaders and diplomats.  Mr. Temin’s commentary on Africa issues has been featured by, among other outlets, the BBC, Al Jazeera, The New York Times, The Washington Post, ForeignPolicy.com, Voice of America and National Public Radio.  He has also testified before the US Senate Committee on Foreign Relations on Sudan and South Sudan.

Prior to joining USIP in January 2009, Mr. Temin spent five years with the non-governmental organization CHF International designing development and peacebuilding programs throughout Africa and elsewhere. He has working experience in more than a dozen countries across Africa, Latin America and Eastern Europe. Mr. Temin is the author of numerous articles focusing on Africa, conflict and governance which have appeared in, among other publications, African Affairs, Review of African Political Economy, Journal of Peacebuilding and Development, and the Georgetown Journal of International Affairs.  He has also authored multiple reports for USIP.  Mr. Temin holds a B.A. from Swarthmore College and an M.A. in International Relations from The Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.  He is a former Fulbright Fellow in Ghana, where he worked with the Ghana Center for Democratic Development on monitoring media coverage of the 2000 elections.

Publications

  • Learning from Sudan’s 2011 Referendum” (with Lawrence Woocher), USIP Special Report 303, March 2012
  • Toward a New Republic of Sudan” (with Theodore Murphy), USIP Special Report 278, June 2011
  • Would You Fight Again?: Understanding Liberian Ex-Combatant Reintegration” (with Richard Hill and Gwendolyn Taylor), USIP Special Report 211, September 2008
  • What Africa Did Right in 2012,” ForeignPolicy.com, December 20, 2012.
  • Amputation is No Cure for Cancer,” ForeignPolicy.com, October 15, 2012.
  • "Sudan:  The Prospect of Intervention and Its Implications" in Preventing Conflict, Managing Crisis:  European and American Perspectives (Center for Transatlantic Relations, 2011)
  • "Sudan Between War and Peace," Georgetown Journal of International Affairs (Winter/Spring 2011)
  • "Why Sudan Matters," Huffington Post (November 2009)
  • "Avoiding Political Violence Through 2011?" Making Sense of Darfur, SSRC Blogs (October 2009)
  • "Sudan: Court Ruling Will Test Peace Prospects," AllAfrica, (20 July 2009).
  • “Liberia’s Renewal: Maintaining Momentum, Expanding Opportunity,” with W. Phelps. The Africa Journal (Spring 2007)
  • “Building Security Where There is No Security,” with R. Hill and L. Pacholek. Journal of Peacebuilding and Development (Jan. 2007) 
  • “A Workshop on Community-Driven Development and Conflict Management,” with R. Hill. Journal of Peacebuilding and Development (Jan. 2005).
  • “Building and Sustaining Stability in Lofa County, Liberia,” Review of African Political Economy (Dec. 2004)
  • “Sources of Conflict in West Africa”  with C. Ero, in Exploring Subregional Conflict: Seeking New Paths for Conflict Prevention (Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2004).
  • “Considering the Role of the BBC in African Conflict,” Review of African Political Economy (Dec. 2003)
  • “Media Matters: Evaluating the Role of the Media in Ghana’s 2000 Elections,” with D. Smith. African Affairs (Nov./Dec. 2002).
  • “The Media and Ghana’s 2000 Elections” with D. Smith in Deepening Democracy in Ghana: Politics of the 2000 Elections (Freedom Publications, 2001).
  • “A Compelling National Election Drama in Ghana,” The Boston Globe, (24 Dec, 2000)

Publications

Jon Temin, Princeton N. Lyman
January 8, 2014
Only two and a half years since its birth, South Sudan is in crisis. But, horrific as the violence since mid-December has been, the crisis also presents an opportunity to put South Sudan back on the path of democratization, good governance, and peace. USIP’s Princeton N. Lyman, Jon Temin, and Susan Stigant examine what needs to happen to create a foundation for lasting peace and stability.
Jon Temin, Princeton N. Lyman
August 13, 2013
Sudan urgently needs to embark on a national dialogue and reform process that is led by Sudanese and supported by the international community.  Without such a process, Sudan has little chance of breaking its destructive cycle of instability. Authors Ambassador Princeton N. Lyman, a special advisor to the president of USIP and former special envoy for Sudan and South Sudan, and Jon Temin, director of USIP’s Horn of African program, examine the way forward.
Jon Temin
March 21, 2012
Despite dire predictions of violence around the referendum on the secession of southern Sudan, the vote in 2011 was largely peaceful. Understanding why is key to future efforts to prevent conflict.
Jon Temin
March 14, 2012
Jonathan Temin, director of Sudan programs at the U.S. Institute of Peace, testified on the situation in Sudan and South Sudan before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on March 14, 2012.

Articles & Analysis by this Expert

August 6, 2014
By:
George E. Moose, Johnnie Carson, Jon Temin

President Barack Obama’s U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit will be a success to the extent that it updates the perception of Africa’s economic, political and social potential without underestimating the remaining problems of violence, dictatorship and corruption, according to two former assistant secretaries of state for African Affairs.

 

June 25, 2014
by
Jon Temin
August 4, 2014
by
Jon Temin
May 12, 2014
by
Jon Temin
March 28, 2014
by
Jon Temin, Princeton N. Lyman

In the News

June 9, 2013

Jonathan Temin, director of the Sudan and South Sudan program at the United States Institute of Peace, an independent but Congressionally financed organization, called Mr. Bashir's threat “a discouraging development given the relative progress over the ...