Christina Murtaugh

Senior Program Officer, Rule of Law, Center for Governance, Law and Society

Christina Murtaugh is a senior program officer for Rule of Law. Her focus is on the International Network to Promote the Rule of Law (INPROL), a community of practice initiated by the Rule of Law Center in 2007; and the Justice and Security Dialogue (JSD) program. She is acting director of INPROL. In addition, she serves as lead on the development of a Justice and Security Dialogue (JSD) Handbook and co-leads, with Vijay Simhan, on the development of a JSD community of practice. She also advises on JSD programs in Libya, Iraq and the Sahel. She has also worked on the Model Codes for Post-Conflict Criminal Justice Project. In 2008, she worked for the American Bar Association's Rule of Law Initiative-Azberbaijan, focusing on continuing legal education and legal aid programs. Christina has a juris doctorate degree from the William & Mary School of Law with a focus on international law and rule of law. She also holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Kentucky.

Publications:

  • Criminal Justice Reform in Post-Conflict States: A Guide for Practitioners, co-author, United States Institute of Peace & United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, 2011
  • Police and Community Consultative Bodies, co-author, International Network to Promote the Rule of Law, 2010.
  • Establishing an Independent Police Oversight Body, co-author, International Network to Promote the Rule of Law, 2010.
  • United Nations Peacekeeping Mandates, author, International Network to Promote the Rule of Law, 2010.
  • Differences between “Detention” and “Corrections”, co-author, International Network to Promote the Rule of Law, 2010.
  • Establishing and Reforming Bar Associations in Post-Conflict States, author, International Network to Promote the Rule of Law, 2010.
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Publications

September 17, 2014
Three years after the death of Muammar Qaddafi and the end of the revolution in Libya, security and justice are stalled and elusive despite the proliferation of security providers. The power of the gun prevails over the rule of law. Many see no end in sight. Based on a nationwide survey and drawn from interviews and focus group sessions, this report—supported by the USIP and the Small Arms Survey—tracks security and justice in Libya from before the revolution through today, its realities, and its impact on the country and its population.

Articles & Analysis by this Expert

May 12, 2015
By:

Security naturally takes top priority for Libyan citizens these days amid renewed violent conflict, but nationwide political rifts also are causing local civic institutions to break down, said Libyan activists, journalists and analysts during a May 4 online discussion organized by USIP.