Critical elections in Nigeria at national and state levels are scheduled for April. These elections will determine not only new leadership but whether democratic processes can gain traction. To assess the prospects for free and fair elections and to anticipate electoral outcomes, Africare and the U.S. Institute of Peace will host a public workshop on February 22 from 10:00am to 11:30am.

Critical elections in Nigeria at national and state levels are scheduled for April 9, 2011. These elections will not only determine the new leadership but will indicate whether democratic processes can gain traction. Past elections have been seriously flawed, but the current Nigerian administration has pledged to hold credible, transparent elections.

Africare and the U.S. Institute of Peace will host a public workshop on Tuesday February 22, 2011 to assess progress toward that goal and consider next steps toward free and fair 2011 elections.

Speakers

  • Darius Mans, Introductory Remarks
    President
    Africare
  • Peter M. Lewis
    Director, African Studies Program
    School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University
  • Reno Omokri
    Co-Founder
    Council for Youth Empowerment
  • Dave Peterson
    Director of Africa Programs
    National Endowment for Democracy
  • Ambassador Robin Sanders, Co-Moderator
    International Affairs Advisor
    Africare
  • David Smock, Co-Moderator
    Senior Vice President
    U. S. Institute of Peace

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