To better understand the experiences of young diaspora in the United States, integrate their voices into policy dialogues, and encourage youth engagement in peacebuilding, the United States Institute of Peace in partnership with Search for Common Ground and Nomadic Wax, organized the 2010 Youth Diaspora Conference. The Conference was an opportunity for young diaspora from different countries of origin to share their experiences and learn how they can creatively engage in peacebuilding. An evening reception celebrated the conclusion of the 2010 Youth Diaspora Conferece, featuring a keynote address by Grace Akallo.

America is the home of many cultures, with more and more people immigrating every year.  The diaspora of these cultures keep strong connections with their countries of origin, and the experiences they have while living in the United States will impact their home countries.  Many of these diaspora come from countries with a history of violent conflict. To ensure that they have a positive influence back home, organizations like the U. S. Institute for Peace (USIP) and Search for Common Ground have been convening people for dialogue and policy development. Unfortunately, until now, young people have been notably absent from these forums.

As a means of better understanding the experiences of young diaspora in the United States, integrating their voices into policy dialogues, and encouraging youth engagement in peacebuilding, the United States Institute of Peace in partnership with Search for Common Ground and Nomadic Wax Productions co-sponsored the 2010 Youth Diaspora Conference. The Conference was an opportunity for young diaspora to share their experiences and to learn how they can creatively engage in peacebuilding.

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