Zimbabwe

U.S. Policy Today for Africa Tomorrow

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 14:00
Tue, 07/22/2014 - 15:30
Subtitle: 
A Conversation with Ambassadors Carson, Lyman and Moose

On July 22, Ambassadors Carson, Lyman, and Moose discussed U.S.-Africa Engagement at USIP. 

Read the event  analysis, U.S. Africa Summit Leaders Face Weighty Agenda for Continent

Home to burgeoning economies and brutal civil conflicts – sometimes coexisting in the same country – Africa is increasingly prominent in the foreign policy agendas of world powers. In early August, President Obama will convene most of the heads of state of the 54 nations of Africa in Washington, D.C. for the first-ever summit between U.S. and African leaders. There will be no shortage of issues to discuss, from how to harness Africa's economic growth and lift large sections of its population out of poverty, to growing trade between the U.S.

Type of Event or Course: 

Keeping Political Transitions Peaceful

Thu, 09/08/2016 - 09:00
Thu, 09/08/2016 - 12:00
Subtitle: 
A Symposium on How to Improve Policy and Practice

Countries from Myanmar to Chile have moved from autocratic regimes to more inclusive forms of government, though their experiences continue to be fraught with difficulties.  On September 8, the U.S. Institute of Peace hosted a symposium exploring recent research on what factors encourage or inhibit peaceful transitions and how nascent democracies can overcome their fragility. The discussion included a focus on a new study released by Chatham House on Zimbabwe’s potential for peaceful democratic transition.

According to the 2016 Fragile States Index, six of the eight most fragile states—countries that have weak, ineffective, or illegitimate governments and conditions that exacerbate corruption, poverty and violence--are in Africa, and only a handful of the continent's 54 countries are ranked as stable. In Zimbabwe, the intensification of the #ThisFlag campaign may signal an opportunity for peaceful transition from a fragile to a democratic state.

9:00am:
Amb. Princeton Lyman, Welcoming Remarks
Nancy Lindborg, President, USIP, Opening Remarks

9:15am-10:15am: Zimbabwe: Opportunities for, and challenges to, peaceful transition

Dr. Alex Vines 
Head, Africa Programme, Chatham House

Dr. Witney Schneidman
Senior International Advisor for Africa, Covington & Burling LLP

Nicole Wilett-Jensen
Vice President, Albright Stonebridge Group

Amb. Johnnie Carson, Moderator
Senior Advisor to the President, U.S. Institute of Peace

10:15am-10:30am: Coffee Break

10:30am-12:00pm: Lessons learned on factors that encourage and inhibit peaceful transitions

Priscilla Clapp
Senior Advisor, U.S. Institute of Peace

Dr. Abraham Lowenthal
Professor Emeritus of International Relations, University of Southern California

Dr. Nadia Diuk 
Vice President, Europe, Eurasia, Africa, and Latin America and the Caribbean, National Endowment for Democracy

Michael S. Lund
Senior Associate, Management Systems International, Inc.; USIP Senior Fellow, 2012-13

Amb. Princeton Lyman, Moderator
Senior Advisor to the President, U.S. Institute of Peace

Type of Event or Course: 

Oge Onubogu

Oge
Onubogu
Senior Program Officer, Africa Programs

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Oge Onubogu is a senior program officer for Africa in the Middle East & Africa center at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP). Her focus is on civil society development and governance in post-conflict and transitional societies, primarily in sub-Saharan Africa. Currently, she oversees the design and implementation of programs in Nigeria in coordination with USIP’s community of experts.    

Role: 

U.S. Africa Summit Leaders Face Weighty Agenda for Continent

President Barack Obama and African leaders attending the first U.S.-Africa Summit in Washington next month face an array of factors undermining the democratic development and economic growth achieved on the continent in recent decades, according to three former high-level U.S. officials on Africa who spoke at the U.S. Institute of Peace.

Ambassadors Johnnie Carson, Princeton Lyman and George Moose, all of whom now are affiliated with USIP, outlined the priorities that will need to be addressed at the Aug. 4-6 Summit and beyond to achieve the improved security, governance and trade and investment that Africa needs. Leaders of most of Africa’s 54 nations will meet as a group not only with Obama but also with Cabinet members and chief executive officers of major American companies that are potential investors and trading partners.

Viola Gienger
Wed, 07/23/2014 - 13:10
Type of Article: 

Zimbabwe’s—and Mtetwa’s—Troubles Grow as Next Mugabe Term Begins

He has held power in Zimbabwe for a third of a century, and today Robert Mugabe was re-inaugurated as president of the southern African nation—the result of a recent election that was free of violence but marred by widespread voting irregularities.

Thomas Omestad

The continuation of a regime described by human rights organizations and other governments as repressive and lacking effective restraints on state power was a dispiriting blow to advocates of greater freedom and democracy in the impoverished country. They include Beatrice Mtetwa, a human rights lawyer featured in a USIP-funded documentary about her efforts to defend clients against politically motivated charges.

Thu, 08/22/2013 - 14:38
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Partners (HTML): 

At USIP, Zimbabwe’s Beatrice Mtetwa Describes Repression, Legal Challenges

Zimbabwean human rights lawyer Beatrice Mtetwa, who has defended peace activists, journalists, opposition candidates, farmers and ordinary citizens arrested and prosecuted by the government of Robert Mugabe, appeared at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) on April 25, discussing her ongoing efforts to use the country’s laws and court system to defend clients against politically-motivated charges that seem aimed at deterring opponents to Mugabe’s three decades of rule.

Mtetwa spoke on a panel after the screening of a new USIP-funded documentary film, “Beatrice Mtetwa and the Rule of Law.”

In the film, produced and directed by independent filmmaker Lorie Conway and shot in Zimbabwe last year, Mtetwa describes her determination to harness the law to defend victims of political repression: “I will keep trying, and I’m not going to stop….This has to be done. Somebody’s got to do it.”

USIP Staff
Fri, 04/26/2013 - 11:21
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Johnnie Carson

Johnnie
Carson
Senior Advisor to the President

Johnnie Carson is a senior advisor to the President of the U.S. Institute of Peace.

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Ambassador Johnnie Carson was sworn in as assistant secretary of state for the bureau of African affairs, on May 7, 2009. Prior to this he was the national intelligence officer for Africa at the National Intelligence Council, after serving as the senior vice president of the National Defense University in Washington, D.C. (2003-2006).

Role: 

Beatrice Mtetwa and the Rule of Law in Zimbabwe

Thu, 04/25/2013 - 16:00
Thu, 04/25/2013 - 17:30

Following last month's referendum on Zimbabwe's draft constitution and with elections expected later this year, USIP is proud to host a film screening of "Beatrice Mtetwa and the Rule of Law."

Read the event coverage, At USIP, Zimbabwe’s Beatrice Mtetwa Describes Repression, Legal Challenges

Experts: 

Following the March 2013 referendum on Zimbabwe's draft constitution and with elections expected later in 2013, USIP was proud to host a film screening of "Beatrice Mtetwa and the Rule of Law."  This film, which was funded by USIP, depicts the work of Beatrice Mtetwa, a courageous human rights lawyer in Zimbabwe, who has defended peace activists, journalists, opposition candidates, farmers, and ordinary citizens jailed by the Mugabe government.

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Voting in Fear

In Voting in Fear, nine contributors offer pioneering work on the scope and nature of electoral violence in Africa; investigate the forms electoral violence takes; and analyze the factors that precipitate, reduce, and prevent violence. The book breaks new ground with findings from the only known dataset of electoral violence in sub-Saharan Africa, spanning 1990 to 2008. Specific case studies of electoral violence in countries such as Ghana, Kenya, and Nigeria provide the context to further understanding the circumstances under which electoral violence takes place, recedes, or recurs.

"This comprehensive volume introduces state-of-the-art data that help focus debate and research on electoral violence in conflict. Featuring excellent case studies by prominent scholars, Voting in Fear is an accessible, well-researched book that offers thoughtful and realistic policy recommendations."

Terrence Lyons, School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University

Dorina A. Bekoe, editor
Wed, 11/14/2012 - 10:11
Type of Article: 

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Videos & Webcasts

Countries from Myanmar to Chile have moved from autocratic regimes to more inclusive forms of government, though their experiences continue to be fraught with difficulties.  On September 8, the U....

On July 22, Ambassadors Carson, Lyman, and Moose discussed U.S.-Africa Engagement at USIP. 

Read the event  analysis, ...

Learn More

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