Yemen

USIP has engaged in research and programming on rule of law and security sector issues in Yemen since 2012. USIP undertook an assessment of the local justice and security situation in four governorates, published in 2013. It is one of the few assessments to go beyond the capital, Sanaa, and explore the impact of the transition at the local level. USIP also initiated Justice and Security Dialogues (JSDs) with communities in Abyan and Marib governorates, a process-oriented activity designed to encourage local actors to work collectively to solve local justice and security challenges. Forthcoming research explores the relationship between non-state dispute resolution and justice provision in Yemen and political and economic factors affecting judicial independence and separation of powers in Yemen. In addition, the Institute sponsors a Yemen Working Group, which convenes Yemen experts from academia, think tanks and policy research organizations, practitioners, the US government, and the media for invitation-only discussion of pressing issues pertaining to Yemen’s stability, security, and development.

Comparative National Dialogue Approaches

Wed, 11/06/2013 - 09:30
Wed, 11/06/2013 - 11:00
Subtitle: 
Transition Processes in Libya, Tunisia, and Yemen

As Yemen concludes its National Dialogue Conference, many question whether thus far inclusive and peaceful negotiations can act as a model for other transitioning countries. Tunisia also recently designed a national dialogue process to work through a political stalemate and re-start its post-Arab Spring transition process. Libya is also trying to work through its challenges through a holistic, national transition process.

While there are positive lessons learned from both countries’ experiences, there also have been pitfalls. The Yemeni and Tunisian experiences suggest that the timing of national dialogue processes vis-à-vis other political events and their relationship with other issues involved in political transition (such as institutional reform) are critical to ensuring the national dialogue can meet its stated goals.

Speakers included:

  • William Taylor, Opening Remarks
    Vice President, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Dr. Aref Ali Nayed, Panelist
    Chairman, Libya Institute for Advanced Studies
  • Radwan Masmoudi, Panelist
    President, Center for the Study of Islam and Democracy 
  • Daniel Brumberg, Discussant
    Senior Advisor, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Erica Gaston, Discussant
    Senior Program Officer, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Manal Omar, Moderator
    Associate Vice President for the Middle East and Africa, U.S Institute of Peace
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Yemen in Transition: Between Fragmentation and Transformation

A combination of a domestic balance of weakness and concerted international mediation efforts moved Yemen away from the brink of civil war. Yet it must still bridge deep divisions among its many factions if its negotiated transition is to last.

Philip Barrett Holzapfel

Summary

  • As other post–Arab Spring transitions have faltered, Yemen has so far defied expectations, moving from the brink of civil war to a managed transition process, under international mediation, that has largely remained on track.  
  • At the same time, the uprising of 2011 also brought the country's deeper divisions between its multiple power centers to the surface.
Mon, 03/03/2014 - 10:42
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Leanne McKay

Leanne
McKay
Senior Program Officer, Rule of Law Center

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Leanne McKay is a senior program officer with Rule of Law in the Center for Governance, Law and Society at the U.S. Institute of Peace. Her work focuses on engaging government and civil society representatives on the promotion of the rule of law in countries transitioning from conflict.

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Process Lessons Learned in Yemen’s National Dialogue

Yemen’s national dialogue has been lauded as a model for other countries in transition. While it succeeded in convening a broad range of Yemeni society on a host of issues, difficult key issues were left unresolved. Other countries embarking on national dialogues should learn from Yemen’s experience that they must balance the scale of the forum, the weight of the agenda, and the impact on other transitional processes that may be sidelined by a dialogue.

Summary

  • On January 25, Yemen’s National Dialogue Conference (NDC) closed after more than ten months of deliberation. The flagship process within Yemen’s post–Arab Spring transition, the NDC has been lauded as a positive model of inclusive and constructive negotiation. In Tunisia, Libya, Bahrain, and Sudan, similar national dialogue processes have been mooted or are under way.
Erica Gaston
Fri, 02/07/2014 - 15:36
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Libya Institute Accord Advances On-the-Ground Work for Transition

The U.S. Institute of Peace entered an agreement today with the Libya Institute for Advanced Studies (LIAS) to consolidate and formalize USIP’s work on the ground in helping strengthen Libya’s governing institutions and civil society.

USIP Staff

Aref Ali Nayed, chairman and founder of LIAS, signed the memorandum of understanding with USIP President Jim Marshall prior to a panel discussion on the factors involved in national dialogues that have been attempted in the aftermath of “Arab Spring” revolutions in Tunisia, Yemen and Libya.

Wed, 11/06/2013 - 16:42
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Women in the Syrian Crisis

Fri, 09/27/2013 - 10:00
Fri, 09/27/2013 - 12:00

On September 27th, USIP, in coordination with the International Republican Institute’s Women’s Democracy Network and Hivos, hosted a delegation of Syrian women who highlighted women’s roles in the current political context and the challenges they face.

From dismal refugee camps in Jordan and Lebanon, to the dangerous Syrian cities and countryside, Syrian women are on the frontlines daily -- some as freedom fighters and as mothers, others as civil society activists and political change agents.

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Democracy, Like Revolution, is Unattainable Without Women

In this peace brief, author  Sahar F. Aziz argues that the biggest challenge for women in Arab Spring countries is trans­forming their leadership and influence into high-level governance positions, both elected and appointed.

Sahar F. Aziz

Summary

  • The biggest challenge facing women in Arab Spring countries is transforming their leadership and attendant influence during the revolutions into high-level governance positions, both elected and appointed, after the revolutions.
Fri, 06/28/2013 - 11:11
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Sustainable Security in Yemen: Popular Committees in Abyan

In early 2011, as the Arab Spring protests swept through Yemen and crippled government control even in more urban areas Ansar al-Sharia (AAS), a local Islamic militant group affiliated with al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), began to take control of major areas of the far southeastern governorate of Abyan. This not only posed a serious threat to local residents but also to those beyond Yemen’s borders. With Abyan in the control of AAS and beyond government reach, Abyan risked becoming a new safe haven for transnational terrorist, giving breathing space for an already aggressive and growing AQAP.

Erica Gaston

AAS was pushed out of control in 2012 and are now held at bay largely through the efforts of ad hoc, local militia groups known as “Popular Committees” that sprung up out of home-grown resistance to AAS and AQAP. But this short-term solution now risks begetting even bigger long-term problems. Many fear that these unaccountable, untrained militias will become entrenched and dangerous in the long-term –  if they are not already – resulting in abuses against the population, corruption, and obstacles to a regular rule of law presence in the future.

Fri, 06/14/2013 - 12:56
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USIP Prevention Newsletter - March 2012

The March 2012 Prevention Newsletter features a spotlight on U.S.-Pakistan Relations: The year 2011 saw a progressive deterioration in the U.S.-Pakistan relationship. But despite the fact that mutual mistrust is probably at an all time high, there is no appetite to allow the relationship to rupture.

In this Issue

  • SPOTLIGHT on U.S.-Pakistan Relations: The year 2011 saw a progressive deterioration in the U.S.-Pakistan relationship. But despite the fact that mutual mistrust is probably at an all time high, there is no appetite to allow the relationship to rupture.
  • HIGHLIGHTS:
    • Political Transitions amid Economic Turmoil in North Africa 
    • North Korea's New Leadership
    • The Nuclear Question in Iran
    • Israel-Palestine Peace Process 
    • Institutionalizing U.S. Atrocity Prevention Efforts
Thu, 03/01/2012 - 09:00

Articles & Analysis

November 6, 2013

The U.S. Institute of Peace entered an agreement today with the Libya Institute for Advanced Studies (LIAS) to consolidate and formalize USIP’s work on the ground in helping strengthen Libya’s governing institutions and civil society.

Our Work in the Field

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Classroom Courses

Instructor:
Matthew Levinger

This two-day workshop examines sources of conflict in Yemen and the Arabian Peninsula, including governance challenges, declining oil revenues, water shortages, sesessionist movements, and violent extremism.

Participants utilize a range of analytical tools--including context analysis, conflict assessment frameworks, scenario gaming, and situation analysis--to identify conflict drivers and assess the ri

Publications

By:
Philip Barrett Holzapfel
A combination of a domestic balance of weakness and concerted international mediation efforts moved Yemen away from the brink of civil war. Yet it must still bridge deep divisions among its many factions if its negotiated transition is to last.
Yemen’s national dialogue has been lauded as a model for other countries in transition. While it succeeded in convening a broad range of Yemeni society on a host of issues, difficult key issues were left unresolved. Other countries embarking on national dialogues should learn from Yemen’s experience that they must balance the scale of the forum, the weight of the agenda, and the impact on other transitional processes that may be sidelined by a dialogue.