United States

U.S.-China Cooperation in Peace and Security with Ambassador Cui Tiankai

Thu, 04/10/2014 - 09:00
Thu, 04/10/2014 - 10:00

The U.S. Institute of Peace hosted a timely discussion and question-and-answer session with Ambassador Cui Tiankai of the People’s Republic of China.

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel's April visit to China and President Barack Obama's Asia trip soon thereafter underscored the importance of – and some of the tensions underlying – U.S.-China relations. The conversation was continued on Twitter with #USIPChina.

Kristin Lord, Welcoming Remarks
Acting President, U.S. Institute of Peace

Stephen Hadley, Moderator
Chairman of the Board, U.S. Institute of Peace

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Iran Agreement Sets Agenda for Talks Toward Larger Pact

The agreement delineates a plan for real, cooperative activities that achieve initial goals for each side: some of the sanctions relief sought by Iran, and Tehran’s freeze on nuclear progress sought by the P5+1 group (made up of the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council – the U.S., U.K., France, Russia and China, plus Germany).

Training with SENSE: Immersive Peace Game for Civil Affairs Soldiers

A mountainous, agrarian, post-conflict country where a variety of ethnic and political groups jockey for power framed a six-year scenario in a recent U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) exercise for American and Nigerian military officers and defense officials.

Members of the U.S. Army’s 353rd Civil Affairs Command and the Nigerian National Defence College were among a record 71 participants in a three-day training called the Strategic Economic Needs and Security Exercise (SENSE).

Kelly Mader
Tue, 09/17/2013 - 10:39
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USIP President Jim Marshall Leads U.S. Delegation to Crisis Avoidance Track 1.5 Dialogues in Beijing

USIP President Jim Marshall recently led a U.S. delegation to two Track 1.5 dialogues in Beijing aimed at moving quickly beyond intractable official government statements and finding ways for de-escalating tensions in East Asia.

The U.S. delegation led by Marshall in late June included: Stephen Hadley, USIP senior advisor for international affairs and former national security advisor; Admiral Gary Roughead, former chief of Naval Operations; John Park, USIP senior Asia advisor; and a group of Pentagon and State Department officials.

Thu, 07/11/2013 - 11:51
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Peacebuilding in Community Colleges

In Peacebuilding in Community Colleges: A Teaching Resource, David J. Smith underscores the importance of community colleges in strengthening global education and teaching conflict resolution skills. Enlisting contributions by twenty-three community college and peacebuilding professionals, Smith has created a first-of-its-kind volume for faculty and administrators seeking to develop innovative and engaging peacebuilding and conflict resolution initiatives.

David J. Smith

Through case studies, how-to’s, sample syllabi and materials, and inspiring anecdotes, contributors draw on learner-centered strategies, experiential learning, and interdisciplinary relationships to teach practical skills and strengthen global connections.

Mon, 06/03/2013 - 15:22
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USIP Board Members Sworn In

Ambassador George Moose and Joseph Eldridge were sworn in today as members of the United States Institute of Peace’s (USIP) Board of Directors. As board members, Moose and Eldridge will play a role in setting long-term goals and priorities for the Institute as well as monitoring the Institute's financial, administrative, and personnel policies.

Tue, 01/22/2013 - 13:58
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Political and Economic Transition Challenges in Afghanistan

Fri, 01/25/2013 - 13:00
Fri, 01/25/2013 - 16:30
Public Event

In the aftermath of the summit meeting between presidents Obama and Karzai on January 11th, many questions still remain regarding the upcoming security, political and economic transitions in Afghanistan, and the impact these various transitions will have on future peace and stability in Afghanistan. On January 25th, USIP hosted a two-panel event with leading experts on Afghanistan and Pakistan to discuss some of the major challenges and opportunities for peace and political stability in Afghanistan.

In the aftermath of the summit meeting between presidents Obama and Karzai on January 11th, many questions still remain regarding the upcoming security, political and economic transitions in Afghanistan, and the impact these various transitions will have on future peace and stability in Afghanistan. On January 25th, USIP hosted a two-panel event with leading experts on Afghanistan and Pakistan to discuss some of the major challenges and opportunities for peace and political stability in Afghanistan. The two panels are as follows:

U.S. Institute of Peace
2301 Constitution Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20037

Inquiries

If you have any questions about this event, please contact Emily Horin at ehorin@usip.org

1:00-1:10pm - Welcoming Remarks

1:10-2:40pm - Getting to Maybe: Updates on the Reconciliation Process

2:40-3:00pm - Coffee Break

3:00-4:30pm - The Money Angle: The Political Economy of Transition

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The Future of the Pakistan-U.S. Relationship Between Now and 2014

 USIP hosted a panel discussion on the near to medium term future of the Pakistan-U.S. relationship. Panelists examined whether the U.S. outlook towards Pakistan is likely to change in President Obama’s second term and if so, how? What will be the pros and cons of the likely policy shift? What are the expectations from both sides going forward?

Experts: 

November 28, 2012

Panel at Peace Institute Assesses U.S.-Pakistan Relations

Specialists on U.S.-Pakistani relations gathered at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) on November 28 to examine Pakistan’s posture on the 2014 transition in Afghanistan and how strained U.S.-Pakistani ties are likely to play a role in it.

Regional specialists and senior staff from Capitol Hill who gathered at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) on November 28 suggested that U.S.-Pakistani relations, following a period of significant deterioration, have improved and in the future are likely to focus more narrowly on such policy priorities as counterterrorism and nonproliferation.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 17:06
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Articles & Analysis

November 25, 2013
The agreement delineates a plan for real, cooperative activities that achieve initial goals for each side: some of the sanctions relief sought by Iran, and Tehran’s freeze on nuclear progress sought by the P5+1 group (made up of the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council – the U.S., U.K., France, Russia and China, plus Germany).

Our Work in the Field

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Classroom Courses

Instructor:
Bruce MacDonald

This course provides students and practitioners with a balanced, in-depth look at the objectives and evolution of strategic arms control, challenges and potential avenues for a New START follow-on, and other related issues, including implications for U.S. nuclear policy, deterrence and extended deterrence, missile defense, strategic conventional strike, space- and cyber-security, and the nuclear zero issue.  Simulations and small group discussions further enhance the learning experience.
 

Nuclear issues permeate many facets of contemporary international relations, U.S.

Publications

A mountainous, agrarian, post-conflict country where a variety of ethnic and political groups jockey for power framed a six-year scenario in a recent U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) exercise for American and Nigerian military officers and defense officials.
USIP President Jim Marshall recently led a U.S. delegation to two Track 1.5 dialogues in Beijing aimed at moving quickly beyond intractable official government statements and finding ways for de-escalating tensions in East Asia.