United Kingdom

The United Kingdom has historically played a leading role in developing parliamentary democracy and in advancing literature and science. At its zenith in the 19th century, the British Empire stretched over one-fourth of the earth's surface. The first half of the 20th century saw the UK's strength seriously depleted in two world wars and the Irish Republic's withdrawal from the union. The second half witnessed the dismantling of the Empire and the UK rebuilding itself into a modern and prosperous European nation. As one of five permanent members of the UN Security Council and a founding member of NATO and the Commonwealth, the UK pursues a global approach to foreign policy. The UK is also an active member of the EU, although it chose to remain outside the Economic and Monetary Union. The Scottish Parliament, the National Assembly for Wales, and the Northern Ireland Assembly were established in 1999. The latter was suspended until May 2007 due to wrangling over the peace process, but devolution was fully completed in March 2010.

Iran Agreement Sets Agenda for Talks Toward Larger Pact

The agreement delineates a plan for real, cooperative activities that achieve initial goals for each side: some of the sanctions relief sought by Iran, and Tehran’s freeze on nuclear progress sought by the P5+1 group (made up of the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council – the U.S., U.K., France, Russia and China, plus Germany).

Obama Urges Choices for Peace in Northern Ireland and Beyond

Obama was speaking in Belfast’s glass-fronted Waterfront Hall before traveling on to a meeting of the Group of Eight industrialized countries at a golf resort in Enniskillen. The 1998 Good Friday Agreement, negotiated with the shepherding of former U.S. Senator George Mitchell, ended the long-running conflict between Northern Ireland’s Catholics and Protestants. But barriers remain even today, including 100 barricades, or “peace lines” of brick, steel and barbed wire, according to the Associated Press.

Nuclear Nonproliferation and Arms Control Today: An Introduction

Tue, 01/17/2012 - 09:30
Fri, 01/20/2012 - 16:30

This course will provide the nonspecialist with a concise overview of the major building blocks of arms control and nuclear nonproliferation policy as well as current and emerging issues that the world will confront in the coming years.

 

 


New Book Draws Policy Lessons from Northern Ireland Crisis

In the new book “The British State and the Northern Ireland Crisis, 1969-73” (United States Institute of Peace), author William Beattie Smith traces the evolution of British policy in Northern Ireland from 1969 to 1973 and depicts how easily a conflict over national identity can turn into bloodshed. In four case studies of British policymaking, Smith goes beyond the traditional historical narrative to test hypotheses and systematically identify patterns that could recur under comparable conditions in other times and places.
 

For Immediate Release, May 16, 2011
Contact: Meg Pierannunzi, 202-429-4736
              Allison Sturma, 202-429-4725

Mon, 05/16/2011 - 12:56
Type of Article: 

21st Century Issues in Strategic Arms Control and Nuclear Nonproliferation

Tue, 04/12/2011 - 18:00
Tue, 05/24/2011 - 20:00
Public Event

This course has been postponed until further notice.  Please stay tuned for updates to the schedule.

This course will provide the non-specialist with a concise overview of the major building blocks of arms control and nuclear nonproliferation policy as well as current and emerging issues that the world will confront in the coming years. Students will develop critical analytical skills in assessing arms control and nonproliferation issues and a better understanding of their broader impact. Several exercises and group discussions will allow students to sharpen their understanding and analytical skills.

Note: This course has been postponed until further notice.  We apologize for any inconvenience.  Please stay tuned for updates to the schedule.

Registration is open to the public, but the course is only available to those who apply and are accepted.

U.S. Institute of Peace
2301 Constitution Avenue, NW
Washington, D.C. 20037

Inquiries

Please contact Brian Rose at brose@usip.org or 202-429-3812 with any questions about this course. More general questions about the USIP Academy may be directed to academy@usip.org.

Topics

  • How nuclear weapons work, the principles of deterrence and nuclear strategy, and why states choose to pursue nuclear weapons
  • The goals of arms control, how arms control treaties are negotiated, and future prospects for the arms control process
  • The structure, purpose and process of the nuclear nonproliferation regime, including the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT)
  • Challenges to the nonproliferation regime, including “bad actors,” non-NPT nuclear weapons states, and approaches to countering proliferation
  • Challenges of transitioning to a denuclearized world, including nuclear terrorism and materials security, deterrence and security at low levels of nuclear weapons, and other special topics

Exercises

Dealing with the Iranian Nuclear Threat
Iran is one of the most widely discussed cases in nonproliferation today. Ambiguity surrounding the Iranian nuclear program, which Iran argues is for peaceful purposes, is of considerable concern to the United States and its allies. In addition, many Arab states in the region fear the possibility of an Iranian nuclear weapons program. Students will be asked to analyze and discuss the impact of possible developments in the Iranian nuclear program in a simulated crisis environment.

Third Party Deployment of a Missile Defense System
Missile defense is a prominent issue in debates on U.S. nuclear strategy and arms control. However, much of the discussion is solely focused on international responses to developments in U.S. missile defense programs. This exercise asks participants to examine the development of a ballistic missile defense system by a third party in a scenario that mixes analysis with simulated reporting to senior U.S. officials.

Type of Event or Course: 

21st Century Issues in Strategic Arms Control and Nuclear Nonproliferation

Mon, 02/14/2011 - 09:00
Fri, 02/18/2011 - 16:30
Invitational Event

Nuclear issues, including strategic arms control and nuclear nonproliferation, permeate many facets of contemporary international relations, U.S. foreign policy, and regional studies. This course will provide the student with a concise overview of the major building blocks of arms control and nuclear nonproliferation policy as well as current and emerging issues that the world will confront in the coming years.

Note: Registration is open to the public, but the course is only available to those who apply and are accepted.

Nuclear issues, including strategic arms control and nuclear nonproliferation, permeate many facets of contemporary international relations, U.S. foreign policy, and regional studies. While the threat of a large-scale nuclear exchange decreased significantly with the end of the Cold War, the challenges of strategic stability, deterrence, nuclear proliferation and nuclear terrorism remain prominent in an increasingly complex and globalized world. 

United States Institute of Peace
2nd Floor Academy Room
1200 17th St, NW
Washington, D.C. 20036

Inquiries

For further information, please contact Academy staff by e-mail at academy@usip.org or Brian Rose at brose@usip.org.

Topics 

  • How nuclear weapons work, the principles of deterrence and nuclear strategy, and why states choose to pursue nuclear weapons
  • The goals of arms control, how arms control treaties are negotiated, and future prospects for the arms control process
  • The structure, purpose and process of the nuclear nonproliferation regime, including the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT)
  • Challenges to the nonproliferation regime, including “bad actors,” non-NPT nuclear weapons states, and approaches to countering proliferation
  • Challenges of transitioning to a denuclearized world, including nuclear terrorism and materials security, deterrence and security at low levels of nuclear weapons, and other special topics

Exercises

Dealing with the Iranian Nuclear Threat
Iran is one of the most widely discussed cases in nonproliferation today. Ambiguity surrounding the Iranian nuclear program, which Iran argues is for peaceful purposes, is of considerable concern to the United States and its allies. In addition, many Arab states in the region fear the possibility of an Iranian nuclear weapons program. Students will be asked to analyze and discuss the impact of possible developments in the Iranian nuclear program in a simulated crisis environment. 

Third Party Deployment of a Missile Defense System
Missile defense is a prominent issue in debates on U.S. nuclear strategy and arms control. However, much of the discussion is solely focused on international responses to developments in U.S. missile defense programs. This exercise asks participants to examine the development of a ballistic missile defense system by a third party in a scenario that mixes analysis with simulated reporting to senior U.S. officials.

Type of Event or Course: 

On the Issues: Iran and P5+1 Talks

USIP expert Dan Brumberg previews the upcoming talks with Iran and provides background on the current situation.

January 18, 2011

USIP expert Dan Brumberg previews the upcoming P5 +1 talks with Iran and provides background on the current situation.

Dan Brumberg
Tue, 01/18/2011 - 12:23
Type of Article: 

Faint Progress in Geneva?

Daniel Brumberg, Senior Adviser at USIP's Center for Conflict Analysis and Prevention, offers analysis on the "Iran-P5+1" talks held in Geneva, Switzerland on December 6-7, 2010.

It might be said that when it comes to the interminable effort to resolve the conflict over Iran’s nuclear program, the good news is that the December 6-7, “Iran-P5+1” talks in Geneva even took place. Framed by the low expectations that all participants shared going into the talks, the one decision to come out of this meeting, namely to hold a second round of negotiations in January, represents faint but modest progress.

Daniel Brumberg
Thu, 12/16/2010 - 11:44
Type of Article: 

USIP Book Launch Explores Iran's Seriousness

After 30 years of estrangement, the Obama administration is now engaged with Iran in hopes of a deal to ensure Iran’s nuclear energy program is not subverted to make nuclear weapons. On December 1, 2010, Iran experts explored important trends inside Iran and in its dealings with the outside world at the U.S. Institute of Peace’s launch of “The Iran Primer: Power, Politics and U.S. Policy.”

Cheryl Saferstein

After 30 years of estrangement, the Obama administration is now engaged with Iran in hopes of a deal to ensure Iran’s nuclear energy program is not subverted to make nuclear weapons. On December 1, 2010, Iran experts explored important trends inside Iran and in its dealings with the outside world at the U.S. Institute of Peace’s launch of “The Iran Primer: Power, Politics and U.S. Policy.”

Mon, 12/13/2010 (All day)
Type of Article: 

The British State and the Northern Ireland Crisis, 1969-73

Focusing on four case studies, William Beattie Smith traces the evolution of British policy from 1969–73 and depicts how easily a conflict over national identity can turn into bloodshed, grief, and horror; and how difficult it is to restore peace once a serious fight has started.

William Beattie Smith
Sun, 05/01/2011 - 14:13

Articles & Analysis

November 25, 2013

The agreement with Iran penned in Geneva is a significant step because it creates an agenda for cooperative and reciprocal action between Iran and its powerful foes that has not existed before. Without such a deal – even one as short-lived as this six-month framework – no larger agreement is really possible.

Our Work in the Field

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Publications

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USIP Staff
In the new book “The British State and the Northern Ireland Crisis, 1969-73” (United States Institute of Peace), author William Beattie Smith traces the evolution of British policy in Northern Ireland from 1969 to 1973 and depicts how easily a conflict over national identity can turn into bloodshed. In four case studies of British policymaking, Smith goes beyond the traditional historical narrative to test hypotheses and systematically identify patterns that could recur under comparable conditions in other times and places.  
USIP expert Dan Brumberg previews the upcoming talks with Iran and provides background on the current situation.