United Arab Emirates

The Trucial States of the Persian Gulf coast granted the UK control of their defense and foreign affairs in 19th century treaties. In 1971, six of these states - Abu Dhabi, 'Ajman, Al Fujayrah, Ash Shariqah, Dubayy, and Umm al Qaywayn - merged to form the United Arab Emirates (UAE). They were joined in 1972 by Ra's al Khaymah. Its high oil revenues and its moderate foreign policy stance have allowed the UAE to play a vital role in the affairs of the region. For more than three decades, oil and global finance drove the UAE's economy. However, in 2008-09, the confluence of falling oil prices, collapsing real estate prices, and the international banking crisis hit the UAE especially hard. The UAE has essentially avoided the "Arab Spring" unrest seen elsewhere in the Middle East, though in March 2011, political activists and intellectuals signed a petition calling for greater public participation in governance that was widely circulated on the Internet. In an effort to stem potential further unrest, the government announced a multi-year, $1.6-billion infrastructure investment plan for the poorer northern Emirates.

USIP Courses Help Police Strengthen Efforts to Counter Violent Extremism

USIP Academy instructors taught two courses on policing for countering violent extremism (CVE) at Hedayah, the International Center of Excellence for CVE, located in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates from June 24 through 27.

Nathaniel L. Wilson

Hedayah’s mission is to strengthen the capacity for countering violent extremism globally and to connect practitioners working on this critical, complex subject in order for them to learn new perspectives and lessons from environments outside of their own. These courses were the first in a series of education and training programs, representing a new partnership for USIP.

Wed, 07/31/2013 - 11:45
Type of Article: 
Partners (HTML): 

Through a Glass Darkly? The Middle East in 2012

In a period of tremendous change in parts of the world, we are asking USIP leaders, from board members to senior staff and experts, to explain the effects that events abroad and here at home will have on the United States, and the contributions the Institute can and does make. Steven Heydemann is USIP’s senior adviser for Middle East Initiatives.

Steven Heydemann

This past year offered fresh proof that the world we live in is ever dynamic. Fundamental change can come from something as extraordinary as a fruit vendor’s act of defiance in Tunisia to popular revolts by reform movements across the Middle East. At the same time, a decade of war and the weak U.S. economy dictates that there must be new ways to think about the role the U.S. will play in the world in the coming years.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 16:30
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The Gulf States and Syria

The brief examines the interests, connections and dimensions of Syria's popular uprising in the Arab Gulf states. Emile Hokayem is the Senior Fellow for Regional Security at the International Institute for Strategic Studies-Middle East based out of Mamana, Bahrain.

Emile Hokayem

Summary

  • The unrest in Syria offers the Gulf States an opportunity to weaken or even dislodge an Assad regime aligned with Iran, but their ability to project power or shape events in Syria is limited.
  • Dislike of the Assad regime doesn’t necessarily align Gulf interests and long-term vision for Syria. Moreover, cooperation on diplomacy and strategy is lacking.
  • Sectarianism, most evidenced in media commentary and clerical statements, is already a major feature of Gulf discourse on Syria.
Tue, 11/22/2011 - 12:24
Type of Article: 

Security Sector Transformation in North Africa and the Middle East

International efforts to help Arab transition countries with security reform must be driven by country requests, involve many partners, and be tied to broader aims for justice, stability, and economic development.

Summary

Mark Sedra
Fri, 11/18/2011 - 16:23
Type of Article: 

Turmoil in Syria: Reshaping the Middle East?

The Institute invited leading experts from the U.S. and across the Middle East to identify key vectors of influence Syria’s neighbors are bringing to bear on the conflict; to forecast how the on-going conflict in Syria will affect the delicate and volatile regional balance of power; and to examine how the Syrian opposition and the Syria regime are factoring in regional and cross-border dynamics.

The Institute invited leading experts from the U.S. and across the Middle East to identify key vectors of influence Syria’s neighbors are bringing to bear on the conflict; to forecast how the on-going conflict in Syria will affect the delicate and volatile regional balance of power; and to examine how the Syrian opposition and the Syria regime are factoring in regional and cross-border dynamics.

Tue, 11/08/2011 - 15:04
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Iraq, Its Neighbors, and the United States

Iraq, Its Neighbors, and the United States examines how Iraq's evolving political order affects its complex relationships with its neighbors and the United States. The book depicts a region unbalanced, shaped by new and old tensions, struggling with a classic collective action dilemma, and anxious about Iraq's political future, as well as America's role in the region, all of which suggest trouble ahead absent concerted efforts to promote regional cooperation. In the volume's case studies, acclaimed scholars and experts review Iraq's bilateral relationships with Turkey, Iran, Saudi Arabia, the Gulf Arab States, Syria, and Jordan and explore how Iraq's neighbors could advance the country's transition to security and stability.

Henri J. Barkey, Scott B. Lasensky, and Phebe Marr, editors

Foreword by James A. Baker, III and Lee H. Hamilton

Thu, 09/15/2011 - 12:37
Type of Article: 

Manal Omar

Manal
Omar
Associate Vice President, Center for Middle East and Africa

Please submit all media inquiries to interviews@usip.org or call 202.429.3869.

For all other inquiries, please call 202.457.1700.

Languages: Arabic, English

Manal Omar is the Associate Vice-President for the Middle East and Africa Center. Previously, she was regional program manager for the Middle East for Oxfam - Great Britain, where she responded to humanitarian crises in Palestine and Lebanon. Omar has extensive experience in the Middle East. She worked with Women for Women International as regional coordinator for Afghanistan, Iraq and Sudan. She also served as an international advisor for the Libya Stabilization Team in Benghazi in 2011. Omar lived in Baghdad from 2003 to 2005 and set up operations in Iraq.

Role: 

Muslim World Initiative

Building trust and dialogue between political, social and religious leaders

This initiative, which drew to a close in 2009, was designed to help to mobilize moderates, marginalize militants, and bridge the U.S./Muslim-world divide.

Topics: 

Pursuing Safety and Freedom

Fri, 01/22/2010 - 10:00
Fri, 01/22/2010 - 12:00
Public Event

This USIP event examined the complex nexus between democratic change and U.S. security interests, with a principal focus on Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco and Yemen.

U.S. Institute of Peace
1200 17th St, NW
Washington, D.C. 20036


 

Please contact Leslie Thompson for questions regarding this event (202-429-3896).

Can the Obama administration simultaneously pursue democracy and security in the Middle East? Can the U.S. engage autocratic regimes and push for human rights at the same time? The U.S. can and it should, according to a new USIP Study Group Report on Political Reform and Security in the Greater Middle East.

Type of Event or Course: 

In Pursuit of Democracy and Security in the Greater Middle East

This Working Paper is the culmination of the work of the Study Group on Reform and Security.

Can the Obama administration simultaneously pursue democracy and security in the Middle East? Can the U.S. engage autocratic regimes and push for human rights at the same time? The U.S. can and it should, according to a new USIP Study Group Report on Political Reform and Security in the Greater Middle East.

Daniel Brumberg
Thu, 01/21/2010 - 13:20
Type of Article: 

Articles & Analysis

July 31, 2013

USIP Academy instructors taught two courses on policing for countering violent extremism (CVE) at Hedayah, the International Center of Excellence for CVE, located in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates from June 24 through 27.

Our Work in the Field

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Publications

USIP Academy instructors taught two courses on policing for countering violent extremism (CVE) at Hedayah, the International Center of Excellence for CVE, located in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates from June 24 through 27.
In a period of tremendous change in parts of the world, we are asking USIP leaders, from board members to senior staff and experts, to explain the effects that events abroad and here at home will have on the United States, and the contributions the Institute can and does make. Steven Heydemann is USIP’s senior adviser for Middle East Initiatives.