The Two Sudans

On July 9th, 2011 the Republic of South Sudan declared independence, resulting in the most significant redrawing of the map of Africa since decolonization. Both new Sudans face a series of internal and external challenges to peace. The U.S. Institute of Peace is engaging on many of these key issues in an effort to help build a more peaceful, stable and secure Sudan and South Sudan.

Ask an Expert: the Crisis in South Sudan
The Global Peacebuilding Center is connecting you with Susan Stigant, one of USIP's South Sudan experts, who is ready to answer questions about the nature of the conflict. 

Water Security and Conflict Prevention Summit

Tue, 09/10/2013 - 08:30
Tue, 09/10/2013 - 14:00

On September 10, 2013, U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP), the Association of the United States Army (AUSA), and the U.S. Water Partnership (USWP) hosted a summit on the growing concerns in water security and the risks for increased conflict.

Water is an undeniable, un-substitutable, and powerful factor in everyone’s life, from sustaining individual lives to defining both economic and social policies and practices. As populations and demand expand while supplies decline, access to water will become increasingly difficult, raising the prospects for conflict over this precious resource. By 2025, experts estimated that 1.8 billion people will be living in countries or regions of absolute water scarcity.

Experts: 
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Notes from Sudan

Ahead of the country's critical 2011 referendum on whether the South should secede from Sudan, USIP is dedicated to help resolve internal conflicts and help ensure the country's future stability and security. In "Notes from Sudan," USIP's Jon Temin writes about his recent tour of the country to get an update on the status of the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) that ended decades of civil war in Sudan and learn about preparations for the 2011 referendum and the 2010 national elections. 

 

Jonathan Temin

by Jonathan Temin

Fri, 08/21/2009 (All day)
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Peace Education in Sudan? Not as Unlikely as it Might Sound

I was eager to be back in Sudan recently after two years away. I was curious to see how the country had changed and whether anything would seem obviously different several years after the separation of South Sudan.  My USIP colleagues and I were visiting in part to help local partners present a conference on teaching peace studies at the undergraduate level in Sudanese universities.

Working Effectively with Interpreters

The success of a project or mission in a cross-cultural, multilingual environment often depends upon effective communication with an audience or local counterpart. Interpreters play a critical role in bridging language and cultural divides, but that depends upon your ability to work with them effectively. Failed interpretation of an important message or concept can easily lead to miscommunication, embarrassment, strained relationships, or even danger. This course offers practical tips to work effectively with interpreters.

Global Religious Engagement

This course is an introduction to a set of “soft skills” for those who will work closely with religious individuals and groups in a foreign environment. It is geared toward practitioners who will need to engage religious peoples for partnerships, programming, and project implementation, and touches on often-contested issues such as gender and women’s voices, religious freedom, discussing personal beliefs in the public sphere, and how to integrate religion and programming.

South Sudanese Diaspora Leaders at USIP Consider Online Speech Concerns

Members of the South Sudanese diaspora gathered at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) last week to explore ways of fostering their national unity, supporting peace efforts in a conflict with tribal dimensions and countering online speech that disparages people of other tribes.

USIP Staff

The February 6-7 workshop brought together 20 South Sudanese who are community leaders or activists in the United States and who maintain significant contacts with people in their homeland. Instructors from USIP identified participants and organized the conversations, and the group received a briefing from Ambassador Donald Booth, the U.S. special envoy to Sudan and South Sudan.

Wed, 02/12/2014 - 09:58
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South Sudan’s Religious Unity Can Help Heal Wounds of Violence

In mid-December, when it became clear that a meeting in Juba of one of the ruling party's decision-making bodies  was exposing tension and contained the risk of violence, national-level religious leaders of several denominations drew on the impending Christmas season to call for peace through the holiday. The hope was that the holy season in a now-predominantly Christian country could provide a pause to address the growing political rifts.    

South Sudan Crisis, Ways Forward Analyzed at USIP

Though the immediate diplomatic focus should remain on arranging a cease-fire, a longer-term political process to overcome the crisis in South Sudan will need significant involvement by the international community, particularly the United States, members of an expert panel said at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) on January 10.

USIP Staff

"The international community is going to pick up the pieces and the costs of this conflict," said USIP Senior Advisor Princeton Lyman, the former U.S. special envoy for Sudan and South Sudan. Lyman and two other Africa specialists spoke at "Crisis in South Sudan," a joint USIP-Wilson Center event that is part of the Institute's efforts to assess prospects for restoring peace to the world's newest state.

Tue, 01/14/2014 - 12:16
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South Sudan Crisis Requires More Active U.S. Role, USIP’s Lyman Says

U.S. officials and senators warned that South Sudan’s warring leaders risk losing American backing unless they end violence that has killed more than 1,000 people in the past month, and experts such as the U.S. Institute of Peace’s Princeton Lyman urged that the international community take a more assertive role.

Viola Gienger

In addition to the deaths, more than 200,000 South Sudanese have fled their homes and the country’s plentiful oil wells have largely stopped functioning, according to testimony at a hearing of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in Washington. Nancy Lindborg, an assistant administrator at the U.S. Agency for International Development, described the difficulty of delivering humanitarian aid as “spontaneous settlements of displaced people” crop up, including 30,000 people found on Jan. 8.

“We are all deeply, deeply alarmed,” Lindborg said.

Thu, 01/09/2014 - 16:04
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Crisis in South Sudan

Fri, 01/10/2014 - 14:00
Fri, 01/10/2014 - 15:30

The United States Institute of Peace and the Wilson Center hosted a discussion on the current crisis in South Sudan.

Since the middle of December the world’s newest country, South Sudan, has been gripped by violence. What started as a political dispute has escalated into fighting across significant portions of the country. A rebel movement controls important areas and more than a thousand people have been killed. Negotiations between the government and rebels have commenced in Ethiopia, but the fighting continues on the ground.

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Articles & Analysis

April 8, 2014

Nothing prepared me for the coffee-black water coming out of the taps.  It happened just as a large and delicious breakfast was set out for us in a compound dining room and we were starting to wash our hands in sinks at the side. Sudden, dark, and a bit shocking, the water seemed like a betrayal of all the honest hospitality of our generous hosts. We quickly shifted to washing with bottled water and proceeded without further disruption.  Still, the image of that dirty water where clean water had flowed before seemed like a sign that something larger was badly broken.

January 28, 2014
By:
Othow Okoti Abich Onger and Jacqueline H. Wilson
January 14, 2014
By:
USIP Staff
December 19, 2013
By:
Jacqueline H. Wilson

Our Work in the Field

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Classroom Courses

Instructor:
Peter van der Auweraert, Deborah H. Isser, John Bruce

This course will be offered again in the Fall of 2014

Disputes and grievances over land and property are implicated in practically all conflicts. This course provides policymakers and practitioners with analytical tools for assessing and addressing an array of complex land and property disputes, from competing ownership claims and restitution to customary land rights and illegal urban settlements. Drawing on case studies of peace operations and peacebuilding efforts, participants explore the range of entry points (humanitarian, human rights, state building, development, etc.) and options for dispute resolution and structural reform.

Drawing on case studies of peace operations and peacebuilding efforts, participants explore the range of entry points (humanitarian, human rights, state building, development, etc.) and options for

Online Courses

Instructor:
December 11, 2013

This course is designed for international professionals who wish to improve their communication skills when working with an interpreter in a cross-cultural context.

The success of a project or mission in a cross-cultural, multilingual environment often depends upon effective communication with an audience or local counterpart.
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Publications

Members of the South Sudanese diaspora gathered at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) last week to explore ways of fostering their national unity, supporting peace efforts in a conflict with tribal dimensions and countering online speech that disparages people of other tribes.
Though the immediate diplomatic focus should remain on arranging a cease-fire, a longer-term political process to overcome the crisis in South Sudan will need significant involvement by the international community, particularly the United States, members of an expert panel said at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) on January 10.