South Sudan

Efforts to implement an August 2015 peace agreement in South Sudan faltered in July 2016. The civil war, sparked by rivalry between the country’s two main leaders, resumed and has left the country on the brink of genocide, according the United Nations. The U.S. Institute of Peace has worked in South Sudan since before independence to bridge divides between communities and promote inclusion. USIP supports the Sudd Institute to conduct independent research, trains civic leaders on intergroup dialogue and gender dynamics, and produces of a youth-focused radio show. Learn more in USIP’s fact sheet on The Current Situation in South Sudan.

U.S. Special Envoy Speaks on Sudan and South Sudan

Wed, 01/18/2017 - 11:00
Wed, 01/18/2017 - 12:00
Subtitle: 
Amb. Donald Booth on the U.S. Role in Seeking an End to Violence

Ambassador Donald Booth is completing almost two and half years as the U.S. special envoy for Sudan and South Sudan. He will discuss the lessons learned from recent international initiatives to end violent conflict in both countries, and the road ahead for that effort and for the U.S. role.

Despite a national dialogue in Sudan, fighting continues in Darfur and in Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile states. Negotiations toward ending hostilities between the government and armed opposition groups are deadlocked.

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African Politics, African Peace

Mon, 09/12/2016 - 14:00
Mon, 09/12/2016 - 15:30
Subtitle: 
The African Union, Peacekeeping and the Politics of Peace

More than 100,000 peacekeepers deployed in Africa make up three-quarters of such United Nations troops worldwide, and they illustrate the frequent response of the African Union to defuse violent conflict with military forces. But the AU has another strength: political power. On September 12, researchers Alex de Waal and Mulugeta Gebrehiwot of the World Peace Foundation offered recommendations from their new report on how the AU can harness its unique advantage to advance peace and security.

Their new report for the AU argued that the Union must move away from its reactive approach to violent conflict and draw on its inherent political strengths. Their extensive research included case studies of the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Liberia, Somalia and South Sudan.

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Money, War and the Business of Power in the Horn of Africa

Thu, 01/28/2016 - 10:30
Thu, 01/28/2016 - 12:00
Subtitle: 
Obstacles for Lasting Peace

Renewed violence in South Sudan, rising malnutrition in Somalia and a dramatic refugee exodus from Eritrea conspire to undermine sporadic progress in the Horn of Africa. Underlying it all is a political marketplace fueled by money and power. On January 28, a panel of regional experts, including Alex de Waal, author of The Real Politics of the Horn of Africa: Money, War and the Business of Power, discussed the complex interplay between politics and money in the region and the implications for the international community.

Read the event coverage, Patronage and Peace in the Horn of Africa.

The Horn of Africa has experienced both advances and setbacks in recent years. In South Sudan, the hope following independence has been tarnished by the outbreak of war and the troubled peace process. In Somalia, al-Shabab and rising malnutrition slows progress on state building. And Eritreans fleeing their country’s oppression accounted for the third-largest group of refugees entering Europe last year, after Syria and Afghanistan. Across the Horn of Africa, corruption, militarization and military patronage undermine regional stability and sustainable peace..

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U.S. Policy Today for Africa Tomorrow

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 14:00
Tue, 07/22/2014 - 15:30
Subtitle: 
A Conversation with Ambassadors Carson, Lyman and Moose

On July 22, Ambassadors Carson, Lyman, and Moose discussed U.S.-Africa Engagement at USIP. 

Read the event  analysis, U.S. Africa Summit Leaders Face Weighty Agenda for Continent

Home to burgeoning economies and brutal civil conflicts – sometimes coexisting in the same country – Africa is increasingly prominent in the foreign policy agendas of world powers. In early August, President Obama will convene most of the heads of state of the 54 nations of Africa in Washington, D.C. for the first-ever summit between U.S. and African leaders. There will be no shortage of issues to discuss, from how to harness Africa's economic growth and lift large sections of its population out of poverty, to growing trade between the U.S.

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Water Security and Conflict Prevention Summit

Tue, 09/10/2013 - 08:30
Tue, 09/10/2013 - 14:00

On September 10, 2013, U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP), the Association of the United States Army (AUSA), and the U.S. Water Partnership (USWP) hosted a summit on the growing concerns in water security and the risks for increased conflict.

Read the event coverage, USIP Hosts International Gathering on Water Security and Conflict Prevention

Water is an undeniable, un-substitutable, and powerful factor in everyone’s life, from sustaining individual lives to defining both economic and social policies and practices. As populations and demand expand while supplies decline, access to water will become increasingly difficult, raising the prospects for conflict over this precious resource. By 2025, experts estimated that 1.8 billion people will be living in countries or regions of absolute water scarcity.

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States of Fragility and Global Violence: An OECD Report

Tue, 01/24/2017 - 09:30
Tue, 01/24/2017 - 11:30
Subtitle: 
Improving Policies by Better Measuring How Weak States Risk Falling into Crisis

This event has been cancelled. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Over 15 years, nearly half of all people, 3.34 billion, have suffered from political violence or lived under its shadow, notes a new OECD report. Violence is on the rise and, surprisingly, conflict is not the leading cause of death.  Fragile contexts, especially those where governments are ineffective and social contracts with their populations broken—drive much of this violence, plus refugee flight, pandemic diseases and other catastrophes. So understanding and measuring fragility is vital to U.S. and international policies that aim to prevent crises.  Join the U.S. Institute of Peace and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development for the Washington launch of an OECD report—States of Fragility 2016—that offers a new approach to monitoring the fragility of states at risk.

Experts: 

Twenty-two percent of the global population now live in countries where human development is hampered by fragility and violence. On Tuesday, January 24, USIP, OECD, and other specialists will discuss OECD’s States of Fragility report, which presents a new approach for measuring the extent of fragility.

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South Sudan: Looming Genocide, Plans for Prevention

The likelihood that South Sudan will descend into genocide and mass starvation is growing by the day, say diplomats, advocates and journalists familiar with the central African nation. Violence has spread to previously peaceful regions, propelled by a political breakdown that increasingly is becoming a clash of ethnic groups. Efforts to mediate between the government and the armed opposition have collapsed. Action by the U.S. and the international community is needed urgently to prevent further deterioration in overlapping humanitarian, political, economic and security crises, according to South Sudan experts speaking in a forum at the U.S. Institute of Peace that was co-hosted by the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. 

Fred Strasser

Behind the breakdown lies a power struggle between President Salva Kiir and former First Vice President—and now rebel leader—Riek Machar. A previous round of fighting that broke out three years ago paused with a peace agreement in August 2015. When combat resumed in July 2016, it extended to the capital, Juba, for the first time, ending last-ditch efforts to establish a transitional government. The government is yet to make progress on promises to bring in the political or armed opposition, or to improve the humanitarian situation.

Thu, 12/15/2016 - 15:13
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Not On Our Watch in South Sudan

Thu, 12/08/2016 - 10:00
Thu, 12/08/2016 - 11:30
Subtitle: 
Options to Prevent Mass Atrocities and Genocide in the World’s Newest Country

South Sudan is at risk of genocide, according to the United Nations Special Advisor on the Prevention of Genocide. A steady process of ethnic cleansing is underway in several areas of the country, through starvation, gang rape and the burning of villages, the U.N. Commission on Human Rights warned in South Sudan last week. In the wake of the de-facto collapse of the 2015 peace deal, new action is needed urgently to prevent further deterioration in South Sudan’s humanitarian, political, economic and security crises. Please join the U.S. Institute of Peace and the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum on December 8 for a discussion with experts about the risks for mass violence and options for upholding the shared U.S. and global responsibility to prevent genocide.

Read the event coverage, South Sudan: Looming Genocide, Plans for Prevention.

Despite the August 2015 peace deal, South Sudan is in crisis. When fighting between forces loyal to President Kiir and then-First Vice President Riek Machar extended to Juba for the first time in July 2016, efforts to establish the transitional government collapsed. Machar ultimately fled the country and his party split. Those who remained in Juba were appointed to government positions, but the government has yet to make progress on its promises to bring in the political or armed opposition or improve the humanitarian situation. 

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The Growing Crisis in South Sudan

Princeton N. Lyman, senior advisor to the president at USIP, testifies before the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights and International Organization.

Chairman Smith, Ranking Member Bass, members of the Subcommittee, I appreciate the opportunity to testify today on the situation in South Sudan.  The views I express are my own and not those of the U.S. Institute of Peace, where I am a Senior Advisor.

Wed, 09/07/2016 - 10:17
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South Sudan War Calls for Firm Intervention, Lyman Says

“The answer to the violence, the terrible violation of human rights, the tremendous humanitarian crisis among the population, is to recognize that the current leadership and its major opponents have already violated the principles of sovereignty and have forfeited the right to claim it as a basis for resisting more international intervention,” Lyman told the subcommittee on Africa, global health, global human rights and international organizations in written remarks submitted with his comments in a

Articles & Analysis

The likelihood that South Sudan will descend into genocide and mass starvation is growing by the day, say diplomats, advocates and journalists familiar with the central African nation. Violence...

By:
Fred Strasser

Princeton N. Lyman, senior advisor to the president at USIP, testifies before the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights and International Organization....

By:

A peace plan for South Sudan that was intended to end three years of fighting in the world’s newest nation has failed largely because it “depends on the cooperation of the very antagonists who...

By:
Viola Gienger

Videos & Webcasts

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Ambassador Donald Booth is completing almost two and half years as the U.S. special envoy for Sudan and South Sudan. He will discuss the lessons learned from recent international initiatives to...

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Publications

By:
USIP Staff
South Sudan seceded from Sudan following decades of conflict and a referendum for independence in 2011. Just 18 months later, a power struggle between the new state’s president and vice president...
In the midst of a political shift where power is moving from central institutions to smaller, more distributed units in the international system, the approaches to and methodologies for peacemaking...